Buster is basically a member of the family, which means that just like mom, he deserves a treat every now and then. (Especially when he gives you those adorable puppy eyes—how can you resist?) But with so many choices on the market, knowing which canine snack is worth your money is...ruff (sorry, we had to). That's why we did the research to find the best dog treats you can buy. Here, three of our favorites.

Lori Lapierre holds a Bachelor of Arts and Science in public relations/communications. For 17 years, she worked for a Fortune 500 company before purchasing a business and starting a family. She is a regular freelancer for "Living Light News," an award-winning national publication. Her past writing experience includes school news reporting, church drama, in-house business articles and a self-published mystery, "Duty Free Murder."


My dog loves these! In fact, she now snubs her nose at Milkbones. I omit the sugar, sub the butter with peanut butter, omit the mint and instead double the parsley, which I often just buy dried. I also don't roll them out and use my hands instead to make tiny flat disks--I have a small dog. Great recipe. Makes enough for a two-three month supply for my pooch.
In a medium bowl, stir together the whole wheat flour, powdered milk, wheat germ, and beef bouillon granules. Stir in the bacon grease and egg. Add ice water 1 tablespoon at a time until dough is wet enough to stick together. On a lightly floured surface, roll the dough out to 1/2 inch thickness and cut with cookie cutters. Place biscuits 1 inch apart onto an ungreased baking sheet.

Dogs of all ages, from puppies to seniors, enjoy treats. Dog treats are a wonderful way to bond with your pet, give them something to chew on, reward them for good behavior or just to see them jump for joy. You'll find all their favorites at PetSmart, where we carry a wide selection of top brands. Snacks can even be part of their healthy diet every day, if used sparingly. Dental chews help keep their teeth clean and their gums healthy. Even pups with food sensitivities have a selection of gluten free, grain free, and natural dog treats to choose from. With real meaty bones, flavored dental treats, crunchy cookies and baked goods, rawhide, puppy treats and more, finding something they'll love is simple.
I offered her one of these bones and, to my surprise, she took it immediately. But then she set it down and came back to me. That is because she knew I had the other unopened treats and probably was looking for more. When she saw that wasn't happening, she went and checked out the bone I gave her and she gobbled it up. Wow. I was shocked. But relieved because I would have had a lot of little bones that I would have had to give to my sister's dogs if Molly decided these weren't for her.
The case for the plaintiffs was that for many years they and their predecessor, James Spratt, had manufactured and sold, under patents of 1868 and 1881, meat biscuits for feeding dogs, the full name or description of which is " Spratt's Patent Meat Fibrine Dog Cakes," but which are often designated by them, and are commonly known in the trade, as " Spratt's Fibrine Biscuits," or " Spratt's Dog Biscuits," or " Spratt's Dog Cakes," or " Spratt's Meat Biscuits," or " Spratt's Patent Biscuits," or " Patent Dog Biscuits," all which, as the plaintiffs asserted, indicated biscuits of their manufacture and no other. These biscuits are made in a square form, and each is stamped with the words " Spratt's Patent" and with a + in the centre. It was alleged that " the biscuits have been found most valuable as food for dogs, and have acquired a great reputation." They are in large demand, and the plaintiffs make considerable profits from the sale thereof, which profits would be considerably larger but that, as they alleged, fraudulent imitations are frequently palmed off upon the public as the biscuits of the plaintiffs, and then it was charged that the defendant had, in fraud of the plaintiffs and of the public, " been selling to the public, as genuine dog biscuits of the plaintiffs' manufacture, biscuits which are not of the plaintiffs' manufacture, but are a fraudulent imitation thereof as to shape and appearance, and which do not contain the ingredients of the plaintiffs' biscuits." Then several instances were stated in which persons who sent to the shop of the defendant to ask for Spratt's dog biscuits received other biscuits similar, as was alleged, to the plaintiffs' in size, appearance, and weight, the only difference being that, in lieu of the words " Spratt's Patent " and the cross, the biscuits sold were stamped with a hexagon and the words " American meat."
This post totally cracked me up! Mainly because I have been thinking of making little pup treats for 2 weeks now. I’ve been hooked on Diane’s Gingie cookies (see OvenHug for the best gingie recipe eh=vah) and making them non-stop. Our finicky little chihuahua mix loves sharing bites with me. I want to make a gluten free version of my gingies so that our senior pup, Oscar can also join us – he has sensitive tummy issues. I just need to find a bone shaped cookie cutter and we’re in business. Thanks for the laughs. Your pup cookies look amazin’! Thanks for sharing. xo
The bones are small, the size of small regular milk bones, and don't have an offensive odor. They're a brown color and are chewy but not super soft by any means. Molly still has to chew for a while to get these to break down. She had a few of them today but I am going to have to cut back because she is starting to want more and more treats and less actual dog food (which I can't blame her for). I think I will limit these to one per day. They come in a great jar with a screw on/off lid so they'll stay fresh for quite a while. There are loads of them in the 25 ounce jar so these are a good value.

Okay, these are so good, my dog maybe got one or two. My son got a kick out of eating something shaped like a dog biscuit and he and I polished them off in a few days. I used Graham wafer crumbs instead of wheat germ and I used slightly more mint than parsley. Next time I would use a little bit more brown sugar just because we love sweet treats. Fabulous, fun recipe!
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There aren't a lot of soft treats suitable for older dogs that have few remaining teeth, mine is such a dog...she loves them...I looked at the soft treats found in the store, many, many of them oddly contain garlic which is listed as bad for dogs....using such treats not knowing that, mine lost a 3" patch of fur...I threw them away and switched to this treat as well as ceaser treats...her fur has grown back and all seems well...as for flavor, I gave them a 5, not because I have eaten them but again, my dog likes them lol
The English dog biscuit appears to be a nineteenth-century innovation: "With this may be joined farinaceous and vegetable articles — oat-meal, fine-pollard, dog-biscuit, potatoes, carrots, parsnips" (1827);[10] "being in the neighbourhood of Maidenhead, I inspected Mr. Smith's dog-biscuit manufactory, and was surprised to find he has been for a long period manufacturing the enormous quantity of five tons a-week !" (1828)[11]
Not sure what I did wrong but the dough turned out SOOOOO wet! I ended up adding another 1/2 cup of oats and another 1-1.5 cups of flour before I could work with it! And it was still very gummy. BUT I got it to work and they are now done. They hardened up well still. Just time to cool and let the pooch try them out! I’m sure he will love them but I’m just curious why my dough was so wet? Overall I’m still very happy with the base of this recipe and ingredients as some I’ve seen have me questioning if it’s a good idea to feed some of the ingredients to my pup. I did sub out canola oil for olive oil as well as I didnt have an canola!

It’s almost fall, ya’ all. It’s been a little while since I made Belle some homemade dog treats, so I thought this would be a perfect time. Our family is headed to Disney World next week. We’re spending five days in the parks and then will be boarding the Disney Dream for a Bahamian cruise. It will be the first time our kids have ever been on a plane, ever been to Disney. . .ever seen the ocean. We’re so excited.


Molly gives her seal of approval. I am going with 5 stars. The ingredients list of actually impressive although the usual colors and preservatives are in there. But these are fortified with many vitamins so they aren't empty snacks and beef is the first ingredient. I also checked and they are made in the USA. THAT's a relief. These are a great choice for even picky dogs. They aren't too hard nor are they so soft that they're gone in an instant (unless you have a really huge dog who gobbled down things). I think most dogs will enjoy these bones.


Deviled eggs are one of the most universally loved apps and snacks. Put a plate down at any holiday get-together or gathering and it’s all but guaranteed they’ll be gobbled up in no time. I’m a purist at heart who believes you can never go wrong with the classic creamy, mustard-spiked filling, although there’s a nearly endless variety of ways to dress up and reinvent these two-bite snacks. Here are 10 of our favorite deviled recipe ideas to consider.

Thanks, and the reason for the discrepancy is because I’ve added a couple more recipes to this list recently. I did update the title and heading and in the body of the article itself, but I haven’t updated all the images yet (one of them says 22, and the one at the top still says 23). Thanks for the reminder, it’s something I’ve been meaning to get around to.
Christi is the baker, cook, blogger, food photographer, recipe developer and sprinkle lover behind Love From The Oven. As a busy mom, it's important to Christi that her recipes are family-friendly and picky eater approved. In addition to running Love From The Oven, Christi is the author of The My Little Pony Baking Book and Smart Cookie, and the co-author of Peeps-A-Licious.
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