To a dog, nothing says “great job” like a tasty treat. Whether he’s earned a reward for obeying commands, being a good boy, or simply being his lovable self, your pooch deserves the best. While many dog treats taste great, not all are healthy. As a daily part of your dog’s diet, choosing treats with a good balance of flavor and nutrition is essential. But with endless treats available, it can be difficult to know where to start. Does size matter? Is texture important? Which ingredients should you look for and which should you avoid? At BestReviews, we’re dedicated to giving our readers the answers they need to find the best buys. We research, analyze, and test products, seeking out expert advice and user feedback, too. And you won’t find any free samples in our labs. Every product we test is selected by us and purchased with our own funds. If choosing the best dog treat is driving you barking mad, you’ve come to the right place! No time to spare? Browse our five favorite dog treats in the matrix above. Or keep reading for our guide to finding the perfect dog treats for your best friend.
Anyway, this big tub holds loads of treats and lasts for ages. I give Molly one a day or sometimes skip a day because she has a variety of treats. I have found that Milk Bone brand makes many treats that my dog enjoys (except for the actual hard milk bones, She won't touch those). The quality s good and the price is also good for the amount of product you get. Molly prefers Pupperoni or other chewy treats but enjoys these as well so I will keep buying them for her. They're better for her teeth than all the chewy snacks and they have pretty decent ingredients.

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Made these for a school fundraiser -'bake sale' last year. I packaged them in bags with dog bones on them and tied with a red ribbon. Wasn't sure how they would go over, made about 30 bags. Sold every single one with people asking for more. One woman called me this year to order 20 bags LOL. My dog loves them and all the dogs in the neighborhood do too.
There are a few things in this recipe that are not good for dogs, so I substituted them for things they could digest. I took out the all-purpose flour, cornmeal, salt, sugar & butter and replaced them with Whole-Wheat flour, honey, and peanut butter. I didn't bother cutting the cookies with a cookie cutter, but rather rolled them into bite-size balls and flattened them into discs. My dogs were "sitting pretty" for them before I even got them into the oven!
Chicken, Soy Grits, Sugar, Corn Starch, Salt, Rice Flour, Dicalcium Phosphate, Propylene Glycol, Guar Gum, Natural Smoke Flavor, Lactic Acid, Garlic Powder, Potassium Sorbate (Used as a Preservative), Minerals (Ferrous Sulfate, Zinc Oxide, Manganous Oxide, Copper Sulfate, Calcium Iodate, Sodium Selenite), Vitamins (Vitamin E Supplement, Vitamin A Supplement, Niacin Supplement, D-Calcium Pantothenate, Riboflavin Supplement, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Thiamine Mononitrate, Vitamin D3 Supplement, Folic Acid, Biotin, Vitamin B12 Supplement), Sodium Nitrite (for Color Retention), BHA (Used as a Preservative).
I just bought my third tub of these MaroSnacks for my Yorkie..She generally doesn't like crunchy snacks preferring chewy ones but she does like these. They're small and have marrow inside which she obviously enjoys because she chews them right up rather than taking them upstairs to hide them. She hides her lesser liked treats for when she is really desperate I guess. Silly dog. 

Thanks, and the reason for the discrepancy is because I’ve added a couple more recipes to this list recently. I did update the title and heading and in the body of the article itself, but I haven’t updated all the images yet (one of them says 22, and the one at the top still says 23). Thanks for the reminder, it’s something I’ve been meaning to get around to.
The point of homemade dog treats is to stay away from preservatives, chemicals, dyes and all the other nonsense. Be smart. Do extensive research on the ingredients you wish to use and the alternative to each of them. Even if you think your dog has a ‘tolerance’ for milk, you should use it regardless unless you 100% know of any additives. In that case I just take milk right out of the equation. Theres no need for it anyway.
Like many of the reviewers, I use whole wheat and rye flours with no corn meal or white flour, and peanut butter instead of butter, but the recipe is very flexible. Here's what I do to simplify: put all the ingredients into a stand mixer at the same time (wasn't that easy), add enough water to get a nice dough. Roll out the dough on a flexible cutting mat and cut with a pizza cutter (any size you want!). Turn over onto a baking sheet. Skip the egg wash if you like and bake about 30 minutes. I roll out about one half of the recipe, freeze the rest for next month. My dog is on a diet so I cut into smallish pieces as training treats. Use a cookie cutter for fancy/gift biscuits. I calculated that 1 inch round biscuits were about 20 calories each, so my little ones are about half that.
I bought this for my 20lb dog who looooooves cheese. I like it because I can easily break it into small pieces for training (one piece is about 1.5" and that's too big for him as a training treat), and my dog who is allergic to a lot of things doesn't seem to have any reaction to this one. However, he isn't crazy about it (he likes it though!), which means its taste is not as cheesy as I hoped. We are in the middle of an intense training period and I need to have different levels of treats. I wanted this one to be the highest prize but unfortunately it didn't work that way.
It’s also common to find by-products and fillers (check the labels of any treats you might have in the cupboard) in dog biscuits rather than natural, organic or high-quality ingredients. When you make small batches of your own doggie biscuits, there’s no need for extra additives or preservatives, another great reason to tie on an apron and get creative in the kitchen.
This homemade dog treat recipe is perfect for novice cooks (myself included). If you’re interested in making some super simple dog treats I’d recommend starting out with this easy recipe. The only ingredients you need are 2 cups of organic whole wheat flour and 2 jars of pureed baby food. For the baby food I’ve found Laika loves blueberry, beef and sweet potato.
Soft & chewy Buddy Biscuits are palatable with no crunch. An excellent choice for all dogs, especially older dogs or smaller dogs who prefer a softer treat. Along with indulging your pup, Buddy Soft & Chewy treats are also perfect for training, with a low calorie count and chock full of flavor to keep your dog motivated. Buddy Biscuits are also oven baked in the USA with only quality, recognizable ingredients. Healthy dog treats made with quality ingredients and natural peanut butter. Palatable, chewy dog treats perfect for older dogs. Baked in USA only. Contain no added corn, soy, fillers,artificial colors, flavors and artificial preservatives
Thanks, and the reason for the discrepancy is because I’ve added a couple more recipes to this list recently. I did update the title and heading and in the body of the article itself, but I haven’t updated all the images yet (one of them says 22, and the one at the top still says 23). Thanks for the reminder, it’s something I’ve been meaning to get around to.
OMG! Thanks a lot for sharing such an informative page about 25 Simple Dog Treat Recipes. I have read your valuable page and gotten much information. I have learned a lot from you that I did not know before. I confused for choosing the dog food recipes information what would be the best for everything but now my confusion has cleared by your review. I hope your all information will help me. Thanks again Jen Gabbard and Keep it up………..
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Mr. Horton Smith, Q.C., in opening the case for the plaintiffs, said that, suspecting that their biscuits were being pirated by the defendant, they adopted the usual course of sending persons to his shop to ask for Spratt's dog biscuits, and in every instance Benton's American meat biscuits, which were similar in shape, size, and general character, were delivered. (April 10, 1886)[16]
This recipe seems a bit ingredient heavy and a tad cumbersome for dog biscuits, however it is absolutely worth the effort. A friend and I made these, and not only are they really tastey for humans, the dogs we "experimented" on with these really enjoyed them too. An added bonus, the mint and parsley in the recipe absolutely caused our dogs to have fresher breath. This completely sealed the deal with this recipe, and we will make it again.
Chicken, Soy Grits, Sugar, Corn Starch, Salt, Rice Flour, Dicalcium Phosphate, Propylene Glycol, Guar Gum, Natural Smoke Flavor, Lactic Acid, Garlic Powder, Potassium Sorbate (Used as a Preservative), Minerals (Ferrous Sulfate, Zinc Oxide, Manganous Oxide, Copper Sulfate, Calcium Iodate, Sodium Selenite), Vitamins (Vitamin E Supplement, Vitamin A Supplement, Niacin Supplement, D-Calcium Pantothenate, Riboflavin Supplement, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Thiamine Mononitrate, Vitamin D3 Supplement, Folic Acid, Biotin, Vitamin B12 Supplement), Sodium Nitrite (for Color Retention), BHA (Used as a Preservative).
The English dog biscuit appears to be a nineteenth-century innovation: "With this may be joined farinaceous and vegetable articles — oat-meal, fine-pollard, dog-biscuit, potatoes, carrots, parsnips" (1827);[10] "being in the neighbourhood of Maidenhead, I inspected Mr. Smith's dog-biscuit manufactory, and was surprised to find he has been for a long period manufacturing the enormous quantity of five tons a-week !" (1828)[11]
The bones are small, the size of small regular milk bones, and don't have an offensive odor. They're a brown color and are chewy but not super soft by any means. Molly still has to chew for a while to get these to break down. She had a few of them today but I am going to have to cut back because she is starting to want more and more treats and less actual dog food (which I can't blame her for). I think I will limit these to one per day. They come in a great jar with a screw on/off lid so they'll stay fresh for quite a while. There are loads of them in the 25 ounce jar so these are a good value.
Bake these healthy treats a shorter time to keep them chewy, or a little longer for a crispy outside and chewy center. Combine a pound of ground beef, turkey or chicken liver with 1 C. corn meal, 1 1/2 C. flour, 1 tsp. anise seed and 1/2 tsp. salt. Spread into a greased baking pan, bake at 350 degrees for 20 minutes, and slice into squares when cool. Substitute fennel for anise if needed. Add an egg, or grated apple or carrot for more nutrition and flavor. Any ground organ meat, such as heart, can be used in place of liver. Dogs love these chewy brownies with nearly any kind of meat.
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