In 1860, still in England, Spratt unveiled Spratt's Patent Meat Fibrine Dog Cakes, a combination of wheat, beetroot, vegetables, and beef blood. Before long, he had competitors with names like Dr. A. C. Daniels' Medicated Dog Bread and F. H. Bennett's Malatoid Dog Biscuits. The products embraced the dubious science and the lightly regulated hucksterism of their era. (2009)[14]
Spratt dominated the American market until 1907, when F. H. Bennett, whose own dog biscuits were faring poorly against those of the larger company, had the idea of making them in the shape of a bone. "His 'Maltoid Milk-Bones' were such a success that for the next fifteen years Bennett's Milk-Bone dominated the commercial dog food market in America."[18] In 1931, the National Biscuit Company, now known as Nabisco, bought the company.
My dog, a boston terrier, loves this treat. They are small enough that I can give her a couple, so I like to use them when training for tricks to reward her for doing something particularly hard. They are more exciting than training treats but can still be eaten quickly. This is a huge bin, a great price, and the container is air tight. There are a lot of little bugs where I live that like to infiltrate my dog food, so I actually keep the container every time I empty one and use it to store dog food, treats, etc. The wide mouth to the jar means it's very easy to get in and out of.

Wheat Flour, Wheat Bran, Meat and Bone Meal, Milk, Wheat Germ, Beef Fat (Preserved with BHA), Salt, Natural Flavor, Dicalcium Phosphate, Calcium Carbonate, Brewer's Dried Yeast, Malted Barley Flour, Sodium Metabisulfite (Used As A Preservative), Choline Chloride, Minerals (Ferrous Sulfate, Zinc Oxide, Manganous Oxide, Copper Sulfate, Calcium Iodate, Sodium Selenite), Vitamins (Vitamin E Supplement, Vitamin A Supplement, Niacin Supplement, D-Calcium Pantothenate, Riboflavin Supplement, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Vitamin D3 Supplement, Folic Acid, Biotin, Vitamin B12 Supplement), BHA (Used As A Preservative).
Usually soft and chewy Buddy Biscuits are just that, soft and chewy. Not these. They were so hard and stale that my dog who normally won't eat any treats except the soft and chewy Buddy Biscuits, just looked at me with a glare as though to say, Are you kidding me?! So I tried to give them away to dogs I saw loose in the park. Again no deal. Amazon is great on some things but not Buddy Biscuits. Save your money and buy locally where you'll get the fresh, soft and chewy Buddy Biscuits.
Like many of the reviewers, I use whole wheat and rye flours with no corn meal or white flour, and peanut butter instead of butter, but the recipe is very flexible. Here's what I do to simplify: put all the ingredients into a stand mixer at the same time (wasn't that easy), add enough water to get a nice dough. Roll out the dough on a flexible cutting mat and cut with a pizza cutter (any size you want!). Turn over onto a baking sheet. Skip the egg wash if you like and bake about 30 minutes. I roll out about one half of the recipe, freeze the rest for next month. My dog is on a diet so I cut into smallish pieces as training treats. Use a cookie cutter for fancy/gift biscuits. I calculated that 1 inch round biscuits were about 20 calories each, so my little ones are about half that.
The first time, I made these as written and my dog loved them. This time I omitted the mint and parsley, and after halving tghe dough I added 1/2 cup finely grated cheddar to one half. And added 1/2 cup finely chopped bacon to the other half. They may not hold as long in the pantry, but my dog is flipping out over them. And it's nice to have 2 different flavoreed biscuits.

Not sure what I did wrong but the dough turned out SOOOOO wet! I ended up adding another 1/2 cup of oats and another 1-1.5 cups of flour before I could work with it! And it was still very gummy. BUT I got it to work and they are now done. They hardened up well still. Just time to cool and let the pooch try them out! I’m sure he will love them but I’m just curious why my dough was so wet? Overall I’m still very happy with the base of this recipe and ingredients as some I’ve seen have me questioning if it’s a good idea to feed some of the ingredients to my pup. I did sub out canola oil for olive oil as well as I didnt have an canola!
The bones are small, the size of small regular milk bones, and don't have an offensive odor. They're a brown color and are chewy but not super soft by any means. Molly still has to chew for a while to get these to break down. She had a few of them today but I am going to have to cut back because she is starting to want more and more treats and less actual dog food (which I can't blame her for). I think I will limit these to one per day. They come in a great jar with a screw on/off lid so they'll stay fresh for quite a while. There are loads of them in the 25 ounce jar so these are a good value.
More than 70 years ago, in a little shop in London an electrician named James Spratt conducted experiments which led to the production of Spratt's Patent—a scientifically blended dog food. It was the first attempt to lift the dog out of the class of scavenger which he had occupied from caveman times. The market was untouched, and in those early days, Spratt's Patent secured a bull-dog grip on it that it has never relinquished, despite the fact that in the past seventy years many competitors have tried to wrest the leadership from them. (1920)[15]
- In order to qualify for the $10 eGift Card, the order must meet the minimum order total of $60. In order to qualify for the $25 eGift Card, the order must meet the minimum order total of $100. Order total is calculated after all discounts and Pals Rewards Dollars are applied but before taxes and shipping. This value is represented in your Shopping Cart as the "Total Before Tax".
We have a half Siberian Husky/half German Shepherd mix with loads of energy. So much so that getting him to slow down and listen is a task. Then we found Purina Alpo Variety Snaps Little Bites Dog Treats that worked perfectly in gaining his undivided attention. However over the years, he's become older and not so excited over these treats, too used to them. So to change up things, we bought this Milk-bone Soft Chewy Dog Treats, and oh my gosh. He's back to learning all new tricks again just for a small taste of these. What is so funny now, we offer him the Little Bites Treat square and he's all excited and grabs it, but then drops it immediately while sitting in the at attention pose with no movement at all waiting for this new Milk-bone Soft Chewy Dog Treat..... Once we give him that, he is all posed for another trick/training lesson. Of course if we leave the other square treat laying, he will quickly snatch it up after the Milk-bone treat is gone. But we are so happy he is happy and attentive with these. Thank you!
×