Deviled eggs are one of the most universally loved apps and snacks. Put a plate down at any holiday get-together or gathering and it’s all but guaranteed they’ll be gobbled up in no time. I’m a purist at heart who believes you can never go wrong with the classic creamy, mustard-spiked filling, although there’s a nearly endless variety of ways to dress up and reinvent these two-bite snacks. Here are 10 of our favorite deviled recipe ideas to consider.
Hi Christi, I actually came here baking advice. Your cookies look awesome. I make my own also and am trying to make a business out of it but I’m having trouble as I am a real amatuer baker. My ingredients are 3 cups wheat flour, 2 tsp baking powder, 2 eggs, 1/2 cup chicken broth, 1/2 cup rolled oats, 1/4 sweet potato and 1 cup of pumkin. Bake 350 for 1/2 hr then rest in cooling oven 1 hr. They come out crunchy like i want but easilly broken. When rolling out the dough it is very dry and big cracks around the edge. Very labor intensive to get a batch baked!
Molly gives her seal of approval. I am going with 5 stars. The ingredients list of actually impressive although the usual colors and preservatives are in there. But these are fortified with many vitamins so they aren't empty snacks and beef is the first ingredient. I also checked and they are made in the USA. THAT's a relief. These are a great choice for even picky dogs. They aren't too hard nor are they so soft that they're gone in an instant (unless you have a really huge dog who gobbled down things). I think most dogs will enjoy these bones.
The point of homemade dog treats is to stay away from preservatives, chemicals, dyes and all the other nonsense. Be smart. Do extensive research on the ingredients you wish to use and the alternative to each of them. Even if you think your dog has a ‘tolerance’ for milk, you should use it regardless unless you 100% know of any additives. In that case I just take milk right out of the equation. Theres no need for it anyway.

In a medium bowl, stir together the whole wheat flour, powdered milk, wheat germ, and beef bouillon granules. Stir in the bacon grease and egg. Add ice water 1 tablespoon at a time until dough is wet enough to stick together. On a lightly floured surface, roll the dough out to 1/2 inch thickness and cut with cookie cutters. Place biscuits 1 inch apart onto an ungreased baking sheet.
I just bought my third tub of these MaroSnacks for my Yorkie..She generally doesn't like crunchy snacks preferring chewy ones but she does like these. They're small and have marrow inside which she obviously enjoys because she chews them right up rather than taking them upstairs to hide them. She hides her lesser liked treats for when she is really desperate I guess. Silly dog.
My little Yorkie is so picky. She detests regular milk bones and will not touch them so I was taking a chance buying her this big jar of Milk Bone Soft & Chewy Bones. They came yesterday along with some other treats I bought for her and I decided to offer her one of these bones first. She gets excited when new treats come and was hoping, I think, for more Beggin' Strips but I wanted to change things up. Plus these are actually pretty healthy for her and not too high in calories. She is only eight pounds but the vet wants me to keep her at that weight to avoid issues later on. She is 3 years old now and healthy.
If your pup loves to chew, make your own chew strips with fresh chicken. Slice chicken breasts into 1/8" thick strips and dehydrate in an oven set to 200 degrees Fahrenheit for about two hours, or until the chicken is dried and chewy. Sprinkle with anise prior to drying for extra flavor. Turkey also can be substituted. Poultry chews make a nice alternative to rawhide treats, which could contain chemicals or preservatives. Store extra chews in the refrigerator or freezer. Chicken jerky can also be made in the microwave by cooking the strips for 20 minutes on medium power until they are chewy.
In the south of England it is much the fashion to give sporting-dogs a food called dog-biscuit instead of barley-meal, and the consequences resulting from this simple aliment are most gratifying. Barley-meal, indeed, is an unnatural food, unless it be varied with bones, for a dog delights to gnaw, and thus to exercise those potent teeth with which nature has furnished him ; his stomach, too, is. designed to digest the hard and tough integument of animal substance; hence, barleymeal, as a principal portion of his subsistence, is by no means to be desired. In small private families it is not always possible to ohtain a sufficiency of meat and bones for the sustenance of a dog, and recourse is too frequently had to a coarse and filthy aliment, which is highly objectionable, especially if the creature be debarred from taking daily exercise, fettered by a chain, and restricted, by situation, from obtaining access to grass ; and no one who has not watched the habits of our faithful allies (as we have done), can be aware of the absolute necessity which exists for his obtaining a constant supply of it. If no other good effect resulted from it than the sleekness of his coat and clearness of his skin, these benefits ought to the procured for him; but when his health and comfort are to be also ensured, who, that has a grain of benevolence in his disposition, would hesitate to perform so simple and gratifying an act of duty?
More than 70 years ago, in a little shop in London an electrician named James Spratt conducted experiments which led to the production of Spratt's Patent—a scientifically blended dog food. It was the first attempt to lift the dog out of the class of scavenger which he had occupied from caveman times. The market was untouched, and in those early days, Spratt's Patent secured a bull-dog grip on it that it has never relinquished, despite the fact that in the past seventy years many competitors have tried to wrest the leadership from them. (1920)[15]
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