Wheat Flour, Wheat Bran, Meat and Bone Meal, Beef Fat (Preserved with BHA), Poultry By-Product Meal, Wheat Germ, Chicken Meal, Salt, Bacon Fat, Dicalcium Phosphate, Titanium Dioxide (Color), Brewers Dried Yeast, Malted Barley Flour, Iron Oxide (Color), Choline Chloride, Minerals (Ferrous Sulfate, Zinc Oxide, Manganous Oxide, Copper Sulfate, Calcium Iodate, Sodium Selenite), Vitamins (Vitamin E Supplement, Vitamin A Supplement, Niacin Supplement, D-Calcium Pantothenate, Riboflavin Supplement, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Vitamin D3 Supplement, Folic Acid, Biotin, Vitamin B12 Supplement), Sodium Metabisulfite, Red 40, BHA (Used as a Preservative), Blue 1.
Like many of the reviewers, I use whole wheat and rye flours with no corn meal or white flour, and peanut butter instead of butter, but the recipe is very flexible. Here's what I do to simplify: put all the ingredients into a stand mixer at the same time (wasn't that easy), add enough water to get a nice dough. Roll out the dough on a flexible cutting mat and cut with a pizza cutter (any size you want!). Turn over onto a baking sheet. Skip the egg wash if you like and bake about 30 minutes. I roll out about one half of the recipe, freeze the rest for next month. My dog is on a diet so I cut into smallish pieces as training treats. Use a cookie cutter for fancy/gift biscuits. I calculated that 1 inch round biscuits were about 20 calories each, so my little ones are about half that.
My husky loves milk bones. We give them as treats for going in her crate or getting back from long walks, etc. She’s a 55 pound husky. I was breaking the large size in half for her so I figured I would just get the medium so I didn’t have to break them. However, I feel like the mediums are so small compared to the large, they almost feel smaller than when I was giving her half a large. The product is fine but I’m unhappy with how big a difference in size there is when moving between medium and large.
Bake these healthy treats a shorter time to keep them chewy, or a little longer for a crispy outside and chewy center. Combine a pound of ground beef, turkey or chicken liver with 1 C. corn meal, 1 1/2 C. flour, 1 tsp. anise seed and 1/2 tsp. salt. Spread into a greased baking pan, bake at 350 degrees for 20 minutes, and slice into squares when cool. Substitute fennel for anise if needed. Add an egg, or grated apple or carrot for more nutrition and flavor. Any ground organ meat, such as heart, can be used in place of liver. Dogs love these chewy brownies with nearly any kind of meat.
Dogs of all ages, from puppies to seniors, enjoy treats. Dog treats are a wonderful way to bond with your pet, give them something to chew on, reward them for good behavior or just to see them jump for joy. You'll find all their favorites at PetSmart, where we carry a wide selection of top brands. Snacks can even be part of their healthy diet every day, if used sparingly. Dental chews help keep their teeth clean and their gums healthy. Even pups with food sensitivities have a selection of gluten free, grain free, and natural dog treats to choose from. With real meaty bones, flavored dental treats, crunchy cookies and baked goods, rawhide, puppy treats and more, finding something they'll love is simple.
Bake these healthy treats a shorter time to keep them chewy, or a little longer for a crispy outside and chewy center. Combine a pound of ground beef, turkey or chicken liver with 1 C. corn meal, 1 1/2 C. flour, 1 tsp. anise seed and 1/2 tsp. salt. Spread into a greased baking pan, bake at 350 degrees for 20 minutes, and slice into squares when cool. Substitute fennel for anise if needed. Add an egg, or grated apple or carrot for more nutrition and flavor. Any ground organ meat, such as heart, can be used in place of liver. Dogs love these chewy brownies with nearly any kind of meat.
My dogs used to love all of the soft and chewy Buddy Biscuits flavors. They were easy to break up into soft bits that my tiny and toothless dogs could eat. Around the fall of 2018, I noticed that the treats were arriving hard and not chewy. I assumed they were stale, but after trying more bags, I realized that the company has changed them. They should not label them as soft and chewy anymore. Also, the bags also used to state that the treats are "grain-free", while wheat flour was the 2nd ingredient on the bag! They have removed that claim from the bags, but it made me wonder about the company's awareness of their product, if they have made multiple mistakes in regards to claims and labeling. I've found another truly soft treat here on Amazon that my dogs prefer, and are able to eat.
In a medium bowl, stir together the whole wheat flour, powdered milk, wheat germ, and beef bouillon granules. Stir in the bacon grease and egg. Add ice water 1 tablespoon at a time until dough is wet enough to stick together. On a lightly floured surface, roll the dough out to 1/2 inch thickness and cut with cookie cutters. Place biscuits 1 inch apart onto an ungreased baking sheet.
To a dog, nothing says “great job” like a tasty treat. Whether he’s earned a reward for obeying commands, being a good boy, or simply being his lovable self, your pooch deserves the best. While many dog treats taste great, not all are healthy. As a daily part of your dog’s diet, choosing treats with a good balance of flavor and nutrition is essential. But with endless treats available, it can be difficult to know where to start. Does size matter? Is texture important? Which ingredients should you look for and which should you avoid? At BestReviews, we’re dedicated to giving our readers the answers they need to find the best buys. We research, analyze, and test products, seeking out expert advice and user feedback, too. And you won’t find any free samples in our labs. Every product we test is selected by us and purchased with our own funds. If choosing the best dog treat is driving you barking mad, you’ve come to the right place! No time to spare? Browse our five favorite dog treats in the matrix above. Or keep reading for our guide to finding the perfect dog treats for your best friend.
I can see my next challenge will be trying to get into the Doggie Treats jar without Cody hearing me! Not only were these really easy to make using a food processor, but they are absolutely delicious! Healthy, too! Looking at the recipe I just realized that I forgot the salt, although I did use the suggested peanut butter instead of butter and all whole wheat flour instead of half all purpose flour. I used the parsley, but didn't have the mint. I could see rolling the dough into a log, chilling and slicing to make crackers. They are really delicious! Thank you for the recipe so Cody can get some "good for you" treats, too! This is "our" favorite dog bone recipe so far!

My dog absolutely loves it! I've been looking for a good quality dog treat that's also economical because my pup deserves only the best (that I can afford on my sad college student budget). He's a small, 15lb dachshund-terrier-chihuahua mix and inhales small treats so I worry he'll choke on the ones meant for his size and I'd have to perform the heimlich on the tiny thing. So instead, I bought the Large size which are about the size of his paw and takes him a while to chew through. He loves chewing on things since he's still young so getting this size was perfect. No more inhaling treats, chewing through my stuff, and it keeps him busily happy. The box is huge and I got it at an amazing price compared to in-store and the option for his size were more expensive anyway so I recommend looking through all the sizes for the cheapest one because they always change regardless of the product size/weight.

Anyway, this big tub holds loads of treats and lasts for ages. I give Molly one a day or sometimes skip a day because she has a variety of treats. I have found that Milk Bone brand makes many treats that my dog enjoys (except for the actual hard milk bones, She won't touch those). The quality s good and the price is also good for the amount of product you get. Molly prefers Pupperoni or other chewy treats but enjoys these as well so I will keep buying them for her. They're better for her teeth than all the chewy snacks and they have pretty decent ingredients.
Usually soft and chewy Buddy Biscuits are just that, soft and chewy. Not these. They were so hard and stale that my dog who normally won't eat any treats except the soft and chewy Buddy Biscuits, just looked at me with a glare as though to say, Are you kidding me?! So I tried to give them away to dogs I saw loose in the park. Again no deal. Amazon is great on some things but not Buddy Biscuits. Save your money and buy locally where you'll get the fresh, soft and chewy Buddy Biscuits.
My dogs used to love all of the soft and chewy Buddy Biscuits flavors. They were easy to break up into soft bits that my tiny and toothless dogs could eat. Around the fall of 2018, I noticed that the treats were arriving hard and not chewy. I assumed they were stale, but after trying more bags, I realized that the company has changed them. They should not label them as soft and chewy anymore. Also, the bags also used to state that the treats are "grain-free", while wheat flour was the 2nd ingredient on the bag! They have removed that claim from the bags, but it made me wonder about the company's awareness of their product, if they have made multiple mistakes in regards to claims and labeling. I've found another truly soft treat here on Amazon that my dogs prefer, and are able to eat.
If you have yet to meet the drop dinner, it’s about time you introduced yourself. The concept? Dump a handful of things into a slow cooker or Instant Pot and let the appliance do all the work. Sure, you may have to chop up a few vegetables or sear a piece of meat in the Instant Pot, but really there’s no work for you beyond that besides grabbing the plates and forks.

More than 70 years ago, in a little shop in London an electrician named James Spratt conducted experiments which led to the production of Spratt's Patent—a scientifically blended dog food. It was the first attempt to lift the dog out of the class of scavenger which he had occupied from caveman times. The market was untouched, and in those early days, Spratt's Patent secured a bull-dog grip on it that it has never relinquished, despite the fact that in the past seventy years many competitors have tried to wrest the leadership from them. (1920)[15]
Thank you to the readers who have mentioned the issue with using bacon fat for dogs. A trace amount of bacon grease (two tablespoons divided amongst 30 biscuits = less than 1 gram of bacon fat per serving) shouldn’t be a concern. Of course, we’re not veterinarians over here, so please check with your vet or use an alternative type of oil if you are concerned.
My dog loves these! In fact, she now snubs her nose at Milkbones. I omit the sugar, sub the butter with peanut butter, omit the mint and instead double the parsley, which I often just buy dried. I also don't roll them out and use my hands instead to make tiny flat disks--I have a small dog. Great recipe. Makes enough for a two-three month supply for my pooch.

I love this list! First time making dog treats, didn’t have all the ingredients for one recipe so I used this as inspiration. I used peanut butter, eggs, flour, honey, and vegetable broth to make soft, chewy dog biscuits and used a heart cookie cutter. My pugs & chihuahua, and my boyfriend’s goldens loved em! Even tried one myself heheh – turned out like lightly sweetened peanut butter cookies.

Wow! I have three dogs, A Chihuahua, a King Charles Cavalier and a St. Bernard. They all went wild over these biscuits. I bought a tin of three different size biscuit cutters at Michaels. I'm afraid I'm going to have to search for much bigger one for my St.Bernard! They were very easy to make and rolled out beautifully without any refrigeration. I didn't have fresh parsley or mint, so I just used dried parsely (we were in the middle of a blizzard). I just hope I can keep these guys stocked up now!


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Originally from Chicago, Nicole Janiga joined the Chewy team as a marketing intern in January 2017. Since then, Nicole has continued writing and photographing for Chewy as a Content Collaborator while completing her education at Indiana University’s Kelley School of Business. She is majoring in both marketing and corporate innovation, before returning to Chewy as a Marketing Analyst. In her free time, Nicole enjoys traveling, riding her horse or snuggling up with her Pug, @zoetheloaf, and Terrier, Cozmo. 
It’s Earth Day — or Earth Month, as we prefer! — so naturally, we’re turning our focus to the kitchen. And specifically ways we can create less waste and be more efficient and thoughtful with our output. Between packaging and food scraps, some degree of kitchen waste feels inevitable. For most, there’s no way to eliminate it entirely, but there are a lot of small and easy ways to limit the amount of waste coming out of our kitchens.
As I eat my weight in sweet strawberries this time of year, the subject of what to do with the abundance of spring and summer fruit comes to mind. I am usually more than content with enjoying berries and stone fruit as-is, but when I’ve gone a little overboard at the farmers market, jam is one of the many things I consider making. Or is it jelly? The two terms for fruit spread have always confused me a bit. Luckily, there’s an easy way to distinguish between the two.
Deviled eggs are one of the most universally loved apps and snacks. Put a plate down at any holiday get-together or gathering and it’s all but guaranteed they’ll be gobbled up in no time. I’m a purist at heart who believes you can never go wrong with the classic creamy, mustard-spiked filling, although there’s a nearly endless variety of ways to dress up and reinvent these two-bite snacks. Here are 10 of our favorite deviled recipe ideas to consider.
Bake these healthy treats a shorter time to keep them chewy, or a little longer for a crispy outside and chewy center. Combine a pound of ground beef, turkey or chicken liver with 1 C. corn meal, 1 1/2 C. flour, 1 tsp. anise seed and 1/2 tsp. salt. Spread into a greased baking pan, bake at 350 degrees for 20 minutes, and slice into squares when cool. Substitute fennel for anise if needed. Add an egg, or grated apple or carrot for more nutrition and flavor. Any ground organ meat, such as heart, can be used in place of liver. Dogs love these chewy brownies with nearly any kind of meat.
The point of homemade dog treats is to stay away from preservatives, chemicals, dyes and all the other nonsense. Be smart. Do extensive research on the ingredients you wish to use and the alternative to each of them. Even if you think your dog has a ‘tolerance’ for milk, you should use it regardless unless you 100% know of any additives. In that case I just take milk right out of the equation. Theres no need for it anyway.
OMG! Thanks a lot for sharing such an informative page about 25 Simple Dog Treat Recipes. I have read your valuable page and gotten much information. I have learned a lot from you that I did not know before. I confused for choosing the dog food recipes information what would be the best for everything but now my confusion has cleared by your review. I hope your all information will help me. Thanks again Jen Gabbard and Keep it up………..
My dog absolutely loves it! I've been looking for a good quality dog treat that's also economical because my pup deserves only the best (that I can afford on my sad college student budget). He's a small, 15lb dachshund-terrier-chihuahua mix and inhales small treats so I worry he'll choke on the ones meant for his size and I'd have to perform the heimlich on the tiny thing. So instead, I bought the Large size which are about the size of his paw and takes him a while to chew through. He loves chewing on things since he's still young so getting this size was perfect. No more inhaling treats, chewing through my stuff, and it keeps him busily happy. The box is huge and I got it at an amazing price compared to in-store and the option for his size were more expensive anyway so I recommend looking through all the sizes for the cheapest one because they always change regardless of the product size/weight.
Wheat Flour, Wheat Bran, Meat and Bone Meal, Beef Fat (Preserved with BHA), Poultry By-Product Meal, Wheat Germ, Chicken Meal, Salt, Bacon Fat, Dicalcium Phosphate, Titanium Dioxide (Color), Brewers Dried Yeast, Malted Barley Flour, Iron Oxide (Color), Choline Chloride, Minerals (Ferrous Sulfate, Zinc Oxide, Manganous Oxide, Copper Sulfate, Calcium Iodate, Sodium Selenite), Vitamins (Vitamin E Supplement, Vitamin A Supplement, Niacin Supplement, D-Calcium Pantothenate, Riboflavin Supplement, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Vitamin D3 Supplement, Folic Acid, Biotin, Vitamin B12 Supplement), Sodium Metabisulfite, Red 40, BHA (Used as a Preservative), Blue 1.
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