Hi Christi, I actually came here baking advice. Your cookies look awesome. I make my own also and am trying to make a business out of it but I’m having trouble as I am a real amatuer baker. My ingredients are 3 cups wheat flour, 2 tsp baking powder, 2 eggs, 1/2 cup chicken broth, 1/2 cup rolled oats, 1/4 sweet potato and 1 cup of pumkin. Bake 350 for 1/2 hr then rest in cooling oven 1 hr. They come out crunchy like i want but easilly broken. When rolling out the dough it is very dry and big cracks around the edge. Very labor intensive to get a batch baked!
Originally from Chicago, Nicole Janiga joined the Chewy team as a marketing intern in January 2017. Since then, Nicole has continued writing and photographing for Chewy as a Content Collaborator while completing her education at Indiana University’s Kelley School of Business. She is majoring in both marketing and corporate innovation, before returning to Chewy as a Marketing Analyst. In her free time, Nicole enjoys traveling, riding her horse or snuggling up with her Pug, @zoetheloaf, and Terrier, Cozmo. 
Even if you’ve never baked a thing in your life you can make these simple dog treat recipes. It’s hard to go wrong with five ingredients or less, and there’s comfort to be found in knowing exactly what’s going into your dog’s food. I make homemade dog treats when we’re working on any new training behaviors – the extra focus they bring is priceless.

Made these for a school fundraiser -'bake sale' last year. I packaged them in bags with dog bones on them and tied with a red ribbon. Wasn't sure how they would go over, made about 30 bags. Sold every single one with people asking for more. One woman called me this year to order 20 bags LOL. My dog loves them and all the dogs in the neighborhood do too.
Dog-biscuit is a hard and well-baked mass of coarse, yet clean and wholesome flour, of an inferior kind to that known as sailors' biscuit; and this latter substance, indeed, would be the best substitute for the former with which we are acquainted. A bag of dog-biscuit of five shillings' value, will be an ample supply for a yard-dog during the year: it should be soaked in water, or " pot liquor," for an hour or two ; and if no meat be at hand, a little dripping or lard may be added to it while softening, which will make a relishing meal at a trifling cost. We have for many years known the utility of the plan thus advocated, and we earnestly recommend all who value the safety of the community and their own (to say nothing of the happiness of the canine race), to make trial of the rational and feasible plan which we have detailed." (1841)[12]
When you give the wholesome goodness of Milk-Bone dog snacks, you're giving more than just a tasty treat. The crunchy texture helps remove plaque and tartar buildup, clean your dog’s teeth and even freshen his breath as he chews. These powerhouse biscuits also contain twelve vitamins and minerals to keep your pup in great shape from his teeth to his tail.
As I eat my weight in sweet strawberries this time of year, the subject of what to do with the abundance of spring and summer fruit comes to mind. I am usually more than content with enjoying berries and stone fruit as-is, but when I’ve gone a little overboard at the farmers market, jam is one of the many things I consider making. Or is it jelly? The two terms for fruit spread have always confused me a bit. Luckily, there’s an easy way to distinguish between the two.
Meet my new favorite brunch dish: Hawaiian Roll Egg-in-a Hole. You might be familiar with egg-in-a-hole as a beloved childhood breakfast dish, but this version is easier to cook for a crowd, and delivers big on flavor. Serve this egg bake for family brunch, or whip it up when you’re feeding a hungry crowd. Here are my tricks for nailing it every time. At first glance, this recipe is pretty straightforward: Make a well in each roll, crack in an egg, and bake!

This Easter we were gifted a 22-pound ham (!!!) and while we had our share of Easter feasts, we’ve still got a decent amount left over. I’m not even a little bit mad, because I know I can freeze some for future use and that there are plenty of ways — big and small — that we can use it up this week. Here are 17 of my favorite recipes for using up leftover ham. City hams freeze incredibly well. My suggestion? Freeze the ham in different forms for future use.
My dog, a boston terrier, loves this treat. They are small enough that I can give her a couple, so I like to use them when training for tricks to reward her for doing something particularly hard. They are more exciting than training treats but can still be eaten quickly. This is a huge bin, a great price, and the container is air tight. There are a lot of little bugs where I live that like to infiltrate my dog food, so I actually keep the container every time I empty one and use it to store dog food, treats, etc. The wide mouth to the jar means it's very easy to get in and out of.
I offered her one of these bones and, to my surprise, she took it immediately. But then she set it down and came back to me. That is because she knew I had the other unopened treats and probably was looking for more. When she saw that wasn't happening, she went and checked out the bone I gave her and she gobbled it up. Wow. I was shocked. But relieved because I would have had a lot of little bones that I would have had to give to my sister's dogs if Molly decided these weren't for her.
My daughter volunteers at a dog rescue and we want to make several different batches and bring them to share in celebrating her birthday in a couple months. I LOVE the variety of recipes and especially ones for those dogs with grain allergies or that are diabetic! My question is, will the treats still be good if we make ahead of time and freeze them until closer to the big day? Sadly, I’m not much of a cook so I am not familiar with what freezes well and what wouldn’t.
We have a half Siberian Husky/half German Shepherd mix with loads of energy. So much so that getting him to slow down and listen is a task. Then we found Purina Alpo Variety Snaps Little Bites Dog Treats that worked perfectly in gaining his undivided attention. However over the years, he's become older and not so excited over these treats, too used to them. So to change up things, we bought this Milk-bone Soft Chewy Dog Treats, and oh my gosh. He's back to learning all new tricks again just for a small taste of these. What is so funny now, we offer him the Little Bites Treat square and he's all excited and grabs it, but then drops it immediately while sitting in the at attention pose with no movement at all waiting for this new Milk-bone Soft Chewy Dog Treat..... Once we give him that, he is all posed for another trick/training lesson. Of course if we leave the other square treat laying, he will quickly snatch it up after the Milk-bone treat is gone. But we are so happy he is happy and attentive with these. Thank you!
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