You’ve been at this “business” a while and it would seem you have heard everything under the sun. As I read your comments above, I noticed how patient and kind you are with each person who comments, even if you’ve said the same thing a hundred times, lol. I’m in marketing, and I’m sure you’ve heard this before, but just wanted to point out that your heading and claim could be considered confusing. I landed on your page following a link, “25 Simple Dog Treat Recipes: 5 Ingredients or less.” When I arrived on your page, the heading said “23 Simple Dog Treat Recipes: 5 Ingredients or less.” Perhaps most people wouldn’t notice that the information doesn’t match, but being a person of integrity, I thought you would want to be aware, so you could adjust the Headline to match the claim. Thank you for caring for those furry friends we love so much!
My dog loves these! In fact, she now snubs her nose at Milkbones. I omit the sugar, sub the butter with peanut butter, omit the mint and instead double the parsley, which I often just buy dried. I also don't roll them out and use my hands instead to make tiny flat disks--I have a small dog. Great recipe. Makes enough for a two-three month supply for my pooch.
I didn’t realize you could make dog treats with only 2 ingredients, That’s awesome! All of the recipes sound great. I read some of the other posts, and I’m borrowing one of the ideas. My daughter is in a Girl Scout troop and her troop’s project is to volunteer at a shelter. I will check with the shelter and see if we can bring homemade treats. Thanks for all of the ideas!
Peanut butter and apples are a great snack, whether you're human or canine. Mix together 4 C. flour, 1 tbs. baking powder, 2 3/4 C. water, 1/2 tsp. vanilla, 4 tbsp. honey, 1/4 C. finely chopped apple, 1 tbsp. peanut butter and 1 beaten egg. Spoon into small muffin molds and bake at 350 degrees Fahrenheit for about 75 minutes. Remove chews from the molds as soon as they are cool enough to handle. Store in an air-tight container in the refrigerator. For a healthier treat, substitute 1 C. wheat germ for 1 C. of flour, and add 2 tbsp. of ground flax seed.
My little Yorkie is so picky. She detests regular milk bones and will not touch them so I was taking a chance buying her this big jar of Milk Bone Soft & Chewy Bones. They came yesterday along with some other treats I bought for her and I decided to offer her one of these bones first. She gets excited when new treats come and was hoping, I think, for more Beggin' Strips but I wanted to change things up. Plus these are actually pretty healthy for her and not too high in calories. She is only eight pounds but the vet wants me to keep her at that weight to avoid issues later on. She is 3 years old now and healthy.
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Okay, these are so good, my dog maybe got one or two. My son got a kick out of eating something shaped like a dog biscuit and he and I polished them off in a few days. I used Graham wafer crumbs instead of wheat germ and I used slightly more mint than parsley. Next time I would use a little bit more brown sugar just because we love sweet treats. Fabulous, fun recipe!
By most accounts, the history of the industry begins with a man named James Spratt. An electrician from Cincinnati, Spratt had patented a new type of lightning conductor in 1850. Later in the decade, he traveled to England to sell it. According to industry lore, he had a quayside epiphany in London when he saw a group of dogs eating discarded hardtack, the cheap, tough biscuits carried on ships and known to sailors as "molar breakers." The first major chunk of today's pet industry was born.
In Spain, "pan de perro" is mentioned as early as 1623 in a play by Lope de Vega.[3] It is used here in the sense of giving someone blows; to "give dog's bread" to someone could mean anything from mistreating them to killing them.[4] The latter meaning refers to a special bread (also called zarazas) made with ground glass, poison and needles and intended to kill dogs.[5]
Lifting the Cut Outs - Once you have cut out as many dog biscuits as you can, it's time to transfer the cookies to the baking sheet. Start by pulling away the excess dough from around the cut outs. Place the unused dough back into your bowl to be rolled out. Gently lift the cookie away from the parchment paper or flour covered surface with a metal or thin spatula.
Wheat Flour, Wheat Bran, Meat and Bone Meal, Milk, Wheat Germ, Beef Fat (Preserved with BHA), Salt, Natural Flavor, Dicalcium Phosphate, Calcium Carbonate, Brewer's Dried Yeast, Malted Barley Flour, Sodium Metabisulfite (Used As A Preservative), Choline Chloride, Minerals (Ferrous Sulfate, Zinc Oxide, Manganous Oxide, Copper Sulfate, Calcium Iodate, Sodium Selenite), Vitamins (Vitamin E Supplement, Vitamin A Supplement, Niacin Supplement, D-Calcium Pantothenate, Riboflavin Supplement, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Vitamin D3 Supplement, Folic Acid, Biotin, Vitamin B12 Supplement), BHA (Used As A Preservative).

In 1860, still in England, Spratt unveiled Spratt's Patent Meat Fibrine Dog Cakes, a combination of wheat, beetroot, vegetables, and beef blood. Before long, he had competitors with names like Dr. A. C. Daniels' Medicated Dog Bread and F. H. Bennett's Malatoid Dog Biscuits. The products embraced the dubious science and the lightly regulated hucksterism of their era. (2009)[14]
Hi Christi, I actually came here baking advice. Your cookies look awesome. I make my own also and am trying to make a business out of it but I’m having trouble as I am a real amatuer baker. My ingredients are 3 cups wheat flour, 2 tsp baking powder, 2 eggs, 1/2 cup chicken broth, 1/2 cup rolled oats, 1/4 sweet potato and 1 cup of pumkin. Bake 350 for 1/2 hr then rest in cooling oven 1 hr. They come out crunchy like i want but easilly broken. When rolling out the dough it is very dry and big cracks around the edge. Very labor intensive to get a batch baked!

In a medium bowl, stir together the whole wheat flour, powdered milk, wheat germ, and beef bouillon granules. Stir in the bacon grease and egg. Add ice water 1 tablespoon at a time until dough is wet enough to stick together. On a lightly floured surface, roll the dough out to 1/2 inch thickness and cut with cookie cutters. Place biscuits 1 inch apart onto an ungreased baking sheet.


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Sit. Lay down. Roll over. Paw. Who’s a good girl? (Or, of course, boy!) These are common phrases uttered by dog owners around the world before their dogs favorite time of the day—treat time. While it’s common for dog owners to want to shower their dog with treats to keep them happy, you’ll want to make sure that you're choosing the best option for your pet. There’s a lot to consider when it comes to dog treats — does your dog like the treats, have any allergies or health conditions, and do the treats you choose support overall health needs of your pet? The dog treat market can be a bit difficult to navigate, so we’ve done the navigating for you.
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