Easter Baba (or babka, or babka wielkanocna) has graced Easter tables for Polish families for centuries — along with mazurek cookies, painted eggs, and cheese desserts. The backstory is this: The dessert was originally said to be made in pans that resembled a tall Bundt pan, but without the hole in the center. One medieval recipe claims that their special version — which calls for 24 eggs and 1 tablespoon of freshly pounded vanilla beans that are beaten for more than an hour (!
Bake these healthy treats a shorter time to keep them chewy, or a little longer for a crispy outside and chewy center. Combine a pound of ground beef, turkey or chicken liver with 1 C. corn meal, 1 1/2 C. flour, 1 tsp. anise seed and 1/2 tsp. salt. Spread into a greased baking pan, bake at 350 degrees for 20 minutes, and slice into squares when cool. Substitute fennel for anise if needed. Add an egg, or grated apple or carrot for more nutrition and flavor. Any ground organ meat, such as heart, can be used in place of liver. Dogs love these chewy brownies with nearly any kind of meat.
Bake these healthy treats a shorter time to keep them chewy, or a little longer for a crispy outside and chewy center. Combine a pound of ground beef, turkey or chicken liver with 1 C. corn meal, 1 1/2 C. flour, 1 tsp. anise seed and 1/2 tsp. salt. Spread into a greased baking pan, bake at 350 degrees for 20 minutes, and slice into squares when cool. Substitute fennel for anise if needed. Add an egg, or grated apple or carrot for more nutrition and flavor. Any ground organ meat, such as heart, can be used in place of liver. Dogs love these chewy brownies with nearly any kind of meat.
Meet my new favorite brunch dish: Hawaiian Roll Egg-in-a Hole. You might be familiar with egg-in-a-hole as a beloved childhood breakfast dish, but this version is easier to cook for a crowd, and delivers big on flavor. Serve this egg bake for family brunch, or whip it up when you’re feeding a hungry crowd. Here are my tricks for nailing it every time. At first glance, this recipe is pretty straightforward: Make a well in each roll, crack in an egg, and bake!
My dog, a boston terrier, loves this treat. They are small enough that I can give her a couple, so I like to use them when training for tricks to reward her for doing something particularly hard. They are more exciting than training treats but can still be eaten quickly. This is a huge bin, a great price, and the container is air tight. There are a lot of little bugs where I live that like to infiltrate my dog food, so I actually keep the container every time I empty one and use it to store dog food, treats, etc. The wide mouth to the jar means it's very easy to get in and out of.
My dog loves these! In fact, she now snubs her nose at Milkbones. I omit the sugar, sub the butter with peanut butter, omit the mint and instead double the parsley, which I often just buy dried. I also don't roll them out and use my hands instead to make tiny flat disks--I have a small dog. Great recipe. Makes enough for a two-three month supply for my pooch.
Dog Treat Dough - One thing that you need to consider when choosing cutters is the thickness of your dough. If it contains rolled oats, carob chips, or another chunky ingredient, you want to use very simple shaped cutters like hearts or circles. If your dough is simple and has smooth ingredients, like the turkey wheat free dog treats, you can use shapes that have more detail since the detail will be evident after the biscuits are baked.

The story of Milk-Bone Biscuits began in 1908, when they were created by F.H. Bennett Biscuit Company in a small bakery in New York City. Today, Milk-Bone offers a wide selection of dog treats, catering to dogs of all shapes and sizes. The biscuits are baked with premium ingredients and fortified with minerals and vitamins, making them a wholesome, nutritionally sound choice for your canine friend. With more than 20 varieties of Milk-Bone treats to choose from, it’s easy to find one that shows your love in exactly the right way.


In the south of England it is much the fashion to give sporting-dogs a food called dog-biscuit instead of barley-meal, and the consequences resulting from this simple aliment are most gratifying. Barley-meal, indeed, is an unnatural food, unless it be varied with bones, for a dog delights to gnaw, and thus to exercise those potent teeth with which nature has furnished him ; his stomach, too, is. designed to digest the hard and tough integument of animal substance; hence, barleymeal, as a principal portion of his subsistence, is by no means to be desired. In small private families it is not always possible to ohtain a sufficiency of meat and bones for the sustenance of a dog, and recourse is too frequently had to a coarse and filthy aliment, which is highly objectionable, especially if the creature be debarred from taking daily exercise, fettered by a chain, and restricted, by situation, from obtaining access to grass ; and no one who has not watched the habits of our faithful allies (as we have done), can be aware of the absolute necessity which exists for his obtaining a constant supply of it. If no other good effect resulted from it than the sleekness of his coat and clearness of his skin, these benefits ought to the procured for him; but when his health and comfort are to be also ensured, who, that has a grain of benevolence in his disposition, would hesitate to perform so simple and gratifying an act of duty?

I would love to make these for my dogs! We feed our dogs a raw diet, but unfortunately our Miniature Schnauzer ended up getting pancreatitis (they are prone to it) because of too much fat in his diet. Now, he’s still on raw – just a lower fat diet, but we can’t give him any treats like this anymore – no matter how awesome they sound. Our other dog would LOVE these though. 😉


Frittatas have long been my go-to solution anytime I need to use up the sad-looking produce, wilting herbs, and little nubs of cheese in my fridge. It’s not often I make them with a plan — until now. Inspired by my favorite cheesy dip and the warm spring weather, I came up with a frittata loaded with garlicky marinated artichoke hearts, earthy baby spinach, salty Parm, and rich sour cream. I knew it would be good, but it went above and beyond all of my expectations.
We have a half Siberian Husky/half German Shepherd mix with loads of energy. So much so that getting him to slow down and listen is a task. Then we found Purina Alpo Variety Snaps Little Bites Dog Treats that worked perfectly in gaining his undivided attention. However over the years, he's become older and not so excited over these treats, too used to them. So to change up things, we bought this Milk-bone Soft Chewy Dog Treats, and oh my gosh. He's back to learning all new tricks again just for a small taste of these. What is so funny now, we offer him the Little Bites Treat square and he's all excited and grabs it, but then drops it immediately while sitting in the at attention pose with no movement at all waiting for this new Milk-bone Soft Chewy Dog Treat..... Once we give him that, he is all posed for another trick/training lesson. Of course if we leave the other square treat laying, he will quickly snatch it up after the Milk-bone treat is gone. But we are so happy he is happy and attentive with these. Thank you!
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