My little Yorkie is so picky. She detests regular milk bones and will not touch them so I was taking a chance buying her this big jar of Milk Bone Soft & Chewy Bones. They came yesterday along with some other treats I bought for her and I decided to offer her one of these bones first. She gets excited when new treats come and was hoping, I think, for more Beggin' Strips but I wanted to change things up. Plus these are actually pretty healthy for her and not too high in calories. She is only eight pounds but the vet wants me to keep her at that weight to avoid issues later on. She is 3 years old now and healthy.
Milk-Bone is the dog treat brand that loving dog owners like you have trusted for over 100 years. Our products are made right here in the US with all of the wholesome, nutritious ingredients you feel good about giving your dog every day. Milk-Bone offers more than 20 varieties of treats, so it’s easy to find one that shows your love in exactly the right way.
Christi is the baker, cook, blogger, food photographer, recipe developer and sprinkle lover behind Love From The Oven. As a busy mom, it's important to Christi that her recipes are family-friendly and picky eater approved. In addition to running Love From The Oven, Christi is the author of The My Little Pony Baking Book and Smart Cookie, and the co-author of Peeps-A-Licious.
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Spratt dominated the American market until 1907, when F. H. Bennett, whose own dog biscuits were faring poorly against those of the larger company, had the idea of making them in the shape of a bone. "His 'Maltoid Milk-Bones' were such a success that for the next fifteen years Bennett's Milk-Bone dominated the commercial dog food market in America."[18] In 1931, the National Biscuit Company, now known as Nabisco, bought the company.
Okay, these are so good, my dog maybe got one or two. My son got a kick out of eating something shaped like a dog biscuit and he and I polished them off in a few days. I used Graham wafer crumbs instead of wheat germ and I used slightly more mint than parsley. Next time I would use a little bit more brown sugar just because we love sweet treats. Fabulous, fun recipe!
When preparing homemade dog treats, make sure you take into account any allergies that your pet has to specific ingredients. You will want to avoid adding any ingredient that you suspect that your pet has reacted poorly to in the past. If you are experimenting with new flavors, only feed a small amount of the treat to your dog to see how she reacts to it before giving him an entire treat.

More than 70 years ago, in a little shop in London an electrician named James Spratt conducted experiments which led to the production of Spratt's Patent—a scientifically blended dog food. It was the first attempt to lift the dog out of the class of scavenger which he had occupied from caveman times. The market was untouched, and in those early days, Spratt's Patent secured a bull-dog grip on it that it has never relinquished, despite the fact that in the past seventy years many competitors have tried to wrest the leadership from them. (1920)[15]
Fantastic list! I loved every recipe, until I read #23. I don’t care how little it is, bacon is not good for any animal (although it’s one of MY favorite foods and I’ll eat it, but I won’t give it to my dogs). I read one blogger justify bacon in their dog treat recipe by saying that for the number of treats that their recipe provided, one piece of bacon wasn’t going to hurt a dog. That may be true, but it’s not worth it. Boiled chicken might be used instead. I guarantee dogs would love it, and it would be safer for them. Just as a reminder, the American Kennel Club states:
The case for the plaintiffs was that for many years they and their predecessor, James Spratt, had manufactured and sold, under patents of 1868 and 1881, meat biscuits for feeding dogs, the full name or description of which is " Spratt's Patent Meat Fibrine Dog Cakes," but which are often designated by them, and are commonly known in the trade, as " Spratt's Fibrine Biscuits," or " Spratt's Dog Biscuits," or " Spratt's Dog Cakes," or " Spratt's Meat Biscuits," or " Spratt's Patent Biscuits," or " Patent Dog Biscuits," all which, as the plaintiffs asserted, indicated biscuits of their manufacture and no other. These biscuits are made in a square form, and each is stamped with the words " Spratt's Patent" and with a + in the centre. It was alleged that " the biscuits have been found most valuable as food for dogs, and have acquired a great reputation." They are in large demand, and the plaintiffs make considerable profits from the sale thereof, which profits would be considerably larger but that, as they alleged, fraudulent imitations are frequently palmed off upon the public as the biscuits of the plaintiffs, and then it was charged that the defendant had, in fraud of the plaintiffs and of the public, " been selling to the public, as genuine dog biscuits of the plaintiffs' manufacture, biscuits which are not of the plaintiffs' manufacture, but are a fraudulent imitation thereof as to shape and appearance, and which do not contain the ingredients of the plaintiffs' biscuits." Then several instances were stated in which persons who sent to the shop of the defendant to ask for Spratt's dog biscuits received other biscuits similar, as was alleged, to the plaintiffs' in size, appearance, and weight, the only difference being that, in lieu of the words " Spratt's Patent " and the cross, the biscuits sold were stamped with a hexagon and the words " American meat."

Sit. Lay down. Roll over. Paw. Who’s a good girl? (Or, of course, boy!) These are common phrases uttered by dog owners around the world before their dogs favorite time of the day—treat time. While it’s common for dog owners to want to shower their dog with treats to keep them happy, you’ll want to make sure that you're choosing the best option for your pet. There’s a lot to consider when it comes to dog treats — does your dog like the treats, have any allergies or health conditions, and do the treats you choose support overall health needs of your pet? The dog treat market can be a bit difficult to navigate, so we’ve done the navigating for you.
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