I must agree with previous reviewers that this is not a healthy biscuit recipe for dogs. Our bulldogs have many allergies, so I modified the ingredients and they came out great (just ask our happy pups)! Substituted both the all-purpose flour and whole wheat flour for brown rice flour, eliminated corn meal (too hard for dogs to digest) and used 2-1/2 cups of old fashioned oats. Eliminated wheat germ & brown sugar and used 1/2 cup of all-natural peanut butter with 1 Tbsp. honey. Eliminated salt and only used 1/2 stick of unsalted butter. My substitutions required more liquid, so I used 1-1/2 cups of chicken broth (instead of only 1 cup water). This recipe came out terrific...the whole house smelled like peanut butter cookies (^:
It’s also common to find by-products and fillers (check the labels of any treats you might have in the cupboard) in dog biscuits rather than natural, organic or high-quality ingredients. When you make small batches of your own doggie biscuits, there’s no need for extra additives or preservatives, another great reason to tie on an apron and get creative in the kitchen.
My little Yorkie is so picky. She detests regular milk bones and will not touch them so I was taking a chance buying her this big jar of Milk Bone Soft & Chewy Bones. They came yesterday along with some other treats I bought for her and I decided to offer her one of these bones first. She gets excited when new treats come and was hoping, I think, for more Beggin' Strips but I wanted to change things up. Plus these are actually pretty healthy for her and not too high in calories. She is only eight pounds but the vet wants me to keep her at that weight to avoid issues later on. She is 3 years old now and healthy.
Knead dough on a lightly floured surface for 2 minutes (dough will be sticky). Roll out dough to 1/4-inch thickness. Cut out rounds using a 2-inch fluted cutter. Transfer to baking sheets. Make an indentation towards the bottom of 1 circle using your thumb, then press dough to make an arch of 4 small circles on top of the thumbprint using the tip of your pinky. Repeat with remaining rounds. Freeze for 15 minutes. Bake for 20 minutes, rotating sheets and lightly brushing with remaining 1/2 cup chicken stock halfway through. Turn oven off, and let stand in oven for 40 minutes.
my daughter gave me a deer head/ applehead chiahihiau for a late chritmas present she will be 1 year old the end of july I am noticeing the she will not eat the store boughten treats so I thought I would try homemade treats im also noticeing she will not play with toys I think because she was mistreated befor I got her I keep trying thank you for listening

Like many of the reviewers, I use whole wheat and rye flours with no corn meal or white flour, and peanut butter instead of butter, but the recipe is very flexible. Here's what I do to simplify: put all the ingredients into a stand mixer at the same time (wasn't that easy), add enough water to get a nice dough. Roll out the dough on a flexible cutting mat and cut with a pizza cutter (any size you want!). Turn over onto a baking sheet. Skip the egg wash if you like and bake about 30 minutes. I roll out about one half of the recipe, freeze the rest for next month. My dog is on a diet so I cut into smallish pieces as training treats. Use a cookie cutter for fancy/gift biscuits. I calculated that 1 inch round biscuits were about 20 calories each, so my little ones are about half that.
The point of homemade dog treats is to stay away from preservatives, chemicals, dyes and all the other nonsense. Be smart. Do extensive research on the ingredients you wish to use and the alternative to each of them. Even if you think your dog has a ‘tolerance’ for milk, you should use it regardless unless you 100% know of any additives. In that case I just take milk right out of the equation. Theres no need for it anyway.
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My husky loves milk bones. We give them as treats for going in her crate or getting back from long walks, etc. She’s a 55 pound husky. I was breaking the large size in half for her so I figured I would just get the medium so I didn’t have to break them. However, I feel like the mediums are so small compared to the large, they almost feel smaller than when I was giving her half a large. The product is fine but I’m unhappy with how big a difference in size there is when moving between medium and large.

Dog treats serve a number of useful purposes. They help satisfy your dog’s need to chew, and they’re an indispensable part of training, especially for food-motivated pups. Crunchy dog biscuits and smaller treats can be given as dog training treats or everyday snacks to strengthen the bond between you and your pet. Long-lasting dog treats are great for special occasions. They can help reduce stress as your dog chews or keep her occupied when guests visit. Every pup loves good natural dog bones or bully sticks, and naturally shed antlers for dogs will keep your dogs chewing happily for hours. Chewy also contains a wide range of dog treats including dental chews dog treats, soft dog treats, dog jerky treats, freeze dried dog treats, prescription dog treats, dehydrated dog treats and more. Treat-dispensing dog toys can add another layer of chewing fun. Get the best dog treats, pet food online at Chewy!
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