Not sure what I did wrong but the dough turned out SOOOOO wet! I ended up adding another 1/2 cup of oats and another 1-1.5 cups of flour before I could work with it! And it was still very gummy. BUT I got it to work and they are now done. They hardened up well still. Just time to cool and let the pooch try them out! I’m sure he will love them but I’m just curious why my dough was so wet? Overall I’m still very happy with the base of this recipe and ingredients as some I’ve seen have me questioning if it’s a good idea to feed some of the ingredients to my pup. I did sub out canola oil for olive oil as well as I didnt have an canola!
Dog-biscuit is a hard and well-baked mass of coarse, yet clean and wholesome flour, of an inferior kind to that known as sailors' biscuit; and this latter substance, indeed, would be the best substitute for the former with which we are acquainted. A bag of dog-biscuit of five shillings' value, will be an ample supply for a yard-dog during the year: it should be soaked in water, or " pot liquor," for an hour or two ; and if no meat be at hand, a little dripping or lard may be added to it while softening, which will make a relishing meal at a trifling cost. We have for many years known the utility of the plan thus advocated, and we earnestly recommend all who value the safety of the community and their own (to say nothing of the happiness of the canine race), to make trial of the rational and feasible plan which we have detailed." (1841)[12]
Knead dough on a lightly floured surface for 2 minutes (dough will be sticky). Roll out dough to 1/4-inch thickness. Cut out rounds using a 2-inch fluted cutter. Transfer to baking sheets. Make an indentation towards the bottom of 1 circle using your thumb, then press dough to make an arch of 4 small circles on top of the thumbprint using the tip of your pinky. Repeat with remaining rounds. Freeze for 15 minutes. Bake for 20 minutes, rotating sheets and lightly brushing with remaining 1/2 cup chicken stock halfway through. Turn oven off, and let stand in oven for 40 minutes.
These do something bad to my dog. Not sure what the ingredient could be, but it's enough that i have finally given up on these. I like them for the texture, but they make my dog extremely hyped up and almost manic. It's like watching a dog on cocaine. Scares me. No thanks. This time, I will remember. I had tried this once before and forgotten until the same reaction occurred.
Christi is the baker, cook, blogger, food photographer, recipe developer and sprinkle lover behind Love From The Oven. As a busy mom, it's important to Christi that her recipes are family-friendly and picky eater approved. In addition to running Love From The Oven, Christi is the author of The My Little Pony Baking Book and Smart Cookie, and the co-author of Peeps-A-Licious.
I just bought my third tub of these MaroSnacks for my Yorkie..She generally doesn't like crunchy snacks preferring chewy ones but she does like these. They're small and have marrow inside which she obviously enjoys because she chews them right up rather than taking them upstairs to hide them. She hides her lesser liked treats for when she is really desperate I guess. Silly dog.
Wheat Flour, Wheat Bran, Meat and Bone Meal, Beef Fat (Preserved with BHA), Poultry By-Product Meal, Wheat Germ, Chicken Meal, Salt, Bacon Fat, Dicalcium Phosphate, Titanium Dioxide (Color), Brewers Dried Yeast, Malted Barley Flour, Iron Oxide (Color), Choline Chloride, Minerals (Ferrous Sulfate, Zinc Oxide, Manganous Oxide, Copper Sulfate, Calcium Iodate, Sodium Selenite), Vitamins (Vitamin E Supplement, Vitamin A Supplement, Niacin Supplement, D-Calcium Pantothenate, Riboflavin Supplement, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Vitamin D3 Supplement, Folic Acid, Biotin, Vitamin B12 Supplement), Sodium Metabisulfite, Red 40, BHA (Used as a Preservative), Blue 1.
Even if you’ve never baked a thing in your life you can make these simple dog treat recipes. It’s hard to go wrong with five ingredients or less, and there’s comfort to be found in knowing exactly what’s going into your dog’s food. I make homemade dog treats when we’re working on any new training behaviors – the extra focus they bring is priceless.
If you have yet to meet the drop dinner, it’s about time you introduced yourself. The concept? Dump a handful of things into a slow cooker or Instant Pot and let the appliance do all the work. Sure, you may have to chop up a few vegetables or sear a piece of meat in the Instant Pot, but really there’s no work for you beyond that besides grabbing the plates and forks.
I must agree with previous reviewers that this is not a healthy biscuit recipe for dogs. Our bulldogs have many allergies, so I modified the ingredients and they came out great (just ask our happy pups)! Substituted both the all-purpose flour and whole wheat flour for brown rice flour, eliminated corn meal (too hard for dogs to digest) and used 2-1/2 cups of old fashioned oats. Eliminated wheat germ & brown sugar and used 1/2 cup of all-natural peanut butter with 1 Tbsp. honey. Eliminated salt and only used 1/2 stick of unsalted butter. My substitutions required more liquid, so I used 1-1/2 cups of chicken broth (instead of only 1 cup water). This recipe came out terrific...the whole house smelled like peanut butter cookies (^:
In Spain, "pan de perro" is mentioned as early as 1623 in a play by Lope de Vega.[3] It is used here in the sense of giving someone blows; to "give dog's bread" to someone could mean anything from mistreating them to killing them.[4] The latter meaning refers to a special bread (also called zarazas) made with ground glass, poison and needles and intended to kill dogs.[5]
In 1860, still in England, Spratt unveiled Spratt's Patent Meat Fibrine Dog Cakes, a combination of wheat, beetroot, vegetables, and beef blood. Before long, he had competitors with names like Dr. A. C. Daniels' Medicated Dog Bread and F. H. Bennett's Malatoid Dog Biscuits. The products embraced the dubious science and the lightly regulated hucksterism of their era. (2009)[14]
This homemade dog treat recipe is perfect for novice cooks (myself included). If you’re interested in making some super simple dog treats I’d recommend starting out with this easy recipe. The only ingredients you need are 2 cups of organic whole wheat flour and 2 jars of pureed baby food. For the baby food I’ve found Laika loves blueberry, beef and sweet potato.
Molly gives her seal of approval. I am going with 5 stars. The ingredients list of actually impressive although the usual colors and preservatives are in there. But these are fortified with many vitamins so they aren't empty snacks and beef is the first ingredient. I also checked and they are made in the USA. THAT's a relief. These are a great choice for even picky dogs. They aren't too hard nor are they so soft that they're gone in an instant (unless you have a really huge dog who gobbled down things). I think most dogs will enjoy these bones.

I can see my next challenge will be trying to get into the Doggie Treats jar without Cody hearing me! Not only were these really easy to make using a food processor, but they are absolutely delicious! Healthy, too! Looking at the recipe I just realized that I forgot the salt, although I did use the suggested peanut butter instead of butter and all whole wheat flour instead of half all purpose flour. I used the parsley, but didn't have the mint. I could see rolling the dough into a log, chilling and slicing to make crackers. They are really delicious! Thank you for the recipe so Cody can get some "good for you" treats, too! This is "our" favorite dog bone recipe so far!
More than 70 years ago, in a little shop in London an electrician named James Spratt conducted experiments which led to the production of Spratt's Patent—a scientifically blended dog food. It was the first attempt to lift the dog out of the class of scavenger which he had occupied from caveman times. The market was untouched, and in those early days, Spratt's Patent secured a bull-dog grip on it that it has never relinquished, despite the fact that in the past seventy years many competitors have tried to wrest the leadership from them. (1920)[15] 
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