Fantastic list! I loved every recipe, until I read #23. I don’t care how little it is, bacon is not good for any animal (although it’s one of MY favorite foods and I’ll eat it, but I won’t give it to my dogs). I read one blogger justify bacon in their dog treat recipe by saying that for the number of treats that their recipe provided, one piece of bacon wasn’t going to hurt a dog. That may be true, but it’s not worth it. Boiled chicken might be used instead. I guarantee dogs would love it, and it would be safer for them. Just as a reminder, the American Kennel Club states:
Molly gives her seal of approval. I am going with 5 stars. The ingredients list of actually impressive although the usual colors and preservatives are in there. But these are fortified with many vitamins so they aren't empty snacks and beef is the first ingredient. I also checked and they are made in the USA. THAT's a relief. These are a great choice for even picky dogs. They aren't too hard nor are they so soft that they're gone in an instant (unless you have a really huge dog who gobbled down things). I think most dogs will enjoy these bones.
My dogs used to love all of the soft and chewy Buddy Biscuits flavors. They were easy to break up into soft bits that my tiny and toothless dogs could eat. Around the fall of 2018, I noticed that the treats were arriving hard and not chewy. I assumed they were stale, but after trying more bags, I realized that the company has changed them. They should not label them as soft and chewy anymore. Also, the bags also used to state that the treats are "grain-free", while wheat flour was the 2nd ingredient on the bag! They have removed that claim from the bags, but it made me wonder about the company's awareness of their product, if they have made multiple mistakes in regards to claims and labeling. I've found another truly soft treat here on Amazon that my dogs prefer, and are able to eat.
I must agree with previous reviewers that this is not a healthy biscuit recipe for dogs. Our bulldogs have many allergies, so I modified the ingredients and they came out great (just ask our happy pups)! Substituted both the all-purpose flour and whole wheat flour for brown rice flour, eliminated corn meal (too hard for dogs to digest) and used 2-1/2 cups of old fashioned oats. Eliminated wheat germ & brown sugar and used 1/2 cup of all-natural peanut butter with 1 Tbsp. honey. Eliminated salt and only used 1/2 stick of unsalted butter. My substitutions required more liquid, so I used 1-1/2 cups of chicken broth (instead of only 1 cup water). This recipe came out terrific...the whole house smelled like peanut butter cookies (^:
My dog loves these! In fact, she now snubs her nose at Milkbones. I omit the sugar, sub the butter with peanut butter, omit the mint and instead double the parsley, which I often just buy dried. I also don't roll them out and use my hands instead to make tiny flat disks--I have a small dog. Great recipe. Makes enough for a two-three month supply for my pooch.
I love this list! First time making dog treats, didn’t have all the ingredients for one recipe so I used this as inspiration. I used peanut butter, eggs, flour, honey, and vegetable broth to make soft, chewy dog biscuits and used a heart cookie cutter. My pugs & chihuahua, and my boyfriend’s goldens loved em! Even tried one myself heheh – turned out like lightly sweetened peanut butter cookies.
I bought these Milk-Bone MaroSnacks previously and my Min Pin (as well as the poodle next door ;) loved them, so I purchased them again and for some reason this time, they are making my dog sick with diarrhea. I just had her to the vet and she got a clean bill of health and she only gets the 'growling stomach' & diarrhea when I give her one of these snacks. I don't know if they changed the ingredients or what?
These do something bad to my dog. Not sure what the ingredient could be, but it's enough that i have finally given up on these. I like them for the texture, but they make my dog extremely hyped up and almost manic. It's like watching a dog on cocaine. Scares me. No thanks. This time, I will remember. I had tried this once before and forgotten until the same reaction occurred.
Dogs of all ages, from puppies to seniors, enjoy treats. Dog treats are a wonderful way to bond with your pet, give them something to chew on, reward them for good behavior or just to see them jump for joy. You'll find all their favorites at PetSmart, where we carry a wide selection of top brands. Snacks can even be part of their healthy diet every day, if used sparingly. Dental chews help keep their teeth clean and their gums healthy. Even pups with food sensitivities have a selection of gluten free, grain free, and natural dog treats to choose from. With real meaty bones, flavored dental treats, crunchy cookies and baked goods, rawhide, puppy treats and more, finding something they'll love is simple.
Milk-Bone Soft & Chewy Chicken Recipe Dog Treats offer a tender texture that makes them easy to chew. And because they’re made with real chicken, they’re rich in protein and offer a decadent, savory flavor your dog will crave. The chews should be fed as a snack or treat as part of your pet’s regular healthy diet. Break into small pieces for smaller dogs.
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We have a half Siberian Husky/half German Shepherd mix with loads of energy. So much so that getting him to slow down and listen is a task. Then we found Purina Alpo Variety Snaps Little Bites Dog Treats that worked perfectly in gaining his undivided attention. However over the years, he's become older and not so excited over these treats, too used to them. So to change up things, we bought this Milk-bone Soft Chewy Dog Treats, and oh my gosh. He's back to learning all new tricks again just for a small taste of these. What is so funny now, we offer him the Little Bites Treat square and he's all excited and grabs it, but then drops it immediately while sitting in the at attention pose with no movement at all waiting for this new Milk-bone Soft Chewy Dog Treat..... Once we give him that, he is all posed for another trick/training lesson. Of course if we leave the other square treat laying, he will quickly snatch it up after the Milk-bone treat is gone. But we are so happy he is happy and attentive with these. Thank you!
My dog loves these! In fact, she now snubs her nose at Milkbones. I omit the sugar, sub the butter with peanut butter, omit the mint and instead double the parsley, which I often just buy dried. I also don't roll them out and use my hands instead to make tiny flat disks--I have a small dog. Great recipe. Makes enough for a two-three month supply for my pooch.
I’ve been making these for a long time now. My dog, Lola, knows by the smell when I’m baking for her and is in the kitchen the whole time! To make it easier, I use a pizza cutter and make 1x3” long strips instead of the bone shape. It is much faster with less rolling and these strips fit very nicely into Lola’s Kong. I use all natural peanut butter, and if I remember, get it freshly ground at the grocery store. I also buy the real Ceylon cinnamon to avoid any coumarin overdose if I give her too many treats.
More than 70 years ago, in a little shop in London an electrician named James Spratt conducted experiments which led to the production of Spratt's Patent—a scientifically blended dog food. It was the first attempt to lift the dog out of the class of scavenger which he had occupied from caveman times. The market was untouched, and in those early days, Spratt's Patent secured a bull-dog grip on it that it has never relinquished, despite the fact that in the past seventy years many competitors have tried to wrest the leadership from them. (1920)[15]
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