I just bought my third tub of these MaroSnacks for my Yorkie..She generally doesn't like crunchy snacks preferring chewy ones but she does like these. They're small and have marrow inside which she obviously enjoys because she chews them right up rather than taking them upstairs to hide them. She hides her lesser liked treats for when she is really desperate I guess. Silly dog.
To a dog, nothing says “great job” like a tasty treat. Whether he’s earned a reward for obeying commands, being a good boy, or simply being his lovable self, your pooch deserves the best. While many dog treats taste great, not all are healthy. As a daily part of your dog’s diet, choosing treats with a good balance of flavor and nutrition is essential. But with endless treats available, it can be difficult to know where to start. Does size matter? Is texture important? Which ingredients should you look for and which should you avoid? At BestReviews, we’re dedicated to giving our readers the answers they need to find the best buys. We research, analyze, and test products, seeking out expert advice and user feedback, too. And you won’t find any free samples in our labs. Every product we test is selected by us and purchased with our own funds. If choosing the best dog treat is driving you barking mad, you’ve come to the right place! No time to spare? Browse our five favorite dog treats in the matrix above. Or keep reading for our guide to finding the perfect dog treats for your best friend.
The first time, I made these as written and my dog loved them. This time I omitted the mint and parsley, and after halving tghe dough I added 1/2 cup finely grated cheddar to one half. And added 1/2 cup finely chopped bacon to the other half. They may not hold as long in the pantry, but my dog is flipping out over them. And it's nice to have 2 different flavoreed biscuits.
My husky loves milk bones. We give them as treats for going in her crate or getting back from long walks, etc. She’s a 55 pound husky. I was breaking the large size in half for her so I figured I would just get the medium so I didn’t have to break them. However, I feel like the mediums are so small compared to the large, they almost feel smaller than when I was giving her half a large. The product is fine but I’m unhappy with how big a difference in size there is when moving between medium and large.
One of the pleasures of cooking a ham for a large gathering, obviously outside of eating it, is that the city hams we glaze and bake for holidays are already cooked. This should take the guesswork out of cooking a ham at home, right? But because most hams are quite large and have spiral cuts and giant bones to contend with, it can be hard to tell when a ham is actually “done” cooking. Here’s everything you need to know about ham temperatures for reheating and serving.
Chicken, Soy Grits, Sugar, Corn Starch, Salt, Rice Flour, Dicalcium Phosphate, Propylene Glycol, Guar Gum, Natural Smoke Flavor, Lactic Acid, Garlic Powder, Potassium Sorbate (Used as a Preservative), Minerals (Ferrous Sulfate, Zinc Oxide, Manganous Oxide, Copper Sulfate, Calcium Iodate, Sodium Selenite), Vitamins (Vitamin E Supplement, Vitamin A Supplement, Niacin Supplement, D-Calcium Pantothenate, Riboflavin Supplement, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Thiamine Mononitrate, Vitamin D3 Supplement, Folic Acid, Biotin, Vitamin B12 Supplement), Sodium Nitrite (for Color Retention), BHA (Used as a Preservative).
The case for the plaintiffs was that for many years they and their predecessor, James Spratt, had manufactured and sold, under patents of 1868 and 1881, meat biscuits for feeding dogs, the full name or description of which is " Spratt's Patent Meat Fibrine Dog Cakes," but which are often designated by them, and are commonly known in the trade, as " Spratt's Fibrine Biscuits," or " Spratt's Dog Biscuits," or " Spratt's Dog Cakes," or " Spratt's Meat Biscuits," or " Spratt's Patent Biscuits," or " Patent Dog Biscuits," all which, as the plaintiffs asserted, indicated biscuits of their manufacture and no other. These biscuits are made in a square form, and each is stamped with the words " Spratt's Patent" and with a + in the centre. It was alleged that " the biscuits have been found most valuable as food for dogs, and have acquired a great reputation." They are in large demand, and the plaintiffs make considerable profits from the sale thereof, which profits would be considerably larger but that, as they alleged, fraudulent imitations are frequently palmed off upon the public as the biscuits of the plaintiffs, and then it was charged that the defendant had, in fraud of the plaintiffs and of the public, " been selling to the public, as genuine dog biscuits of the plaintiffs' manufacture, biscuits which are not of the plaintiffs' manufacture, but are a fraudulent imitation thereof as to shape and appearance, and which do not contain the ingredients of the plaintiffs' biscuits." Then several instances were stated in which persons who sent to the shop of the defendant to ask for Spratt's dog biscuits received other biscuits similar, as was alleged, to the plaintiffs' in size, appearance, and weight, the only difference being that, in lieu of the words " Spratt's Patent " and the cross, the biscuits sold were stamped with a hexagon and the words " American meat."
Thankfully, Sage doesn’t have any special allergies or dietary needs, so there’s really no reason for me to make her homemade dog treats other than the fact that I love her something fierce and needed a break from cookies for a minute. But conveniently, this homemade dog treats recipe makes a TON and we know lots of other neighbor-ly dogs who can and will appreciate a little gift bag of soft-baked, peanut butter and bacon glazed homemade dog treats.
The bones are small, the size of small regular milk bones, and don't have an offensive odor. They're a brown color and are chewy but not super soft by any means. Molly still has to chew for a while to get these to break down. She had a few of them today but I am going to have to cut back because she is starting to want more and more treats and less actual dog food (which I can't blame her for). I think I will limit these to one per day. They come in a great jar with a screw on/off lid so they'll stay fresh for quite a while. There are loads of them in the 25 ounce jar so these are a good value.

As I eat my weight in sweet strawberries this time of year, the subject of what to do with the abundance of spring and summer fruit comes to mind. I am usually more than content with enjoying berries and stone fruit as-is, but when I’ve gone a little overboard at the farmers market, jam is one of the many things I consider making. Or is it jelly? The two terms for fruit spread have always confused me a bit. Luckily, there’s an easy way to distinguish between the two.


There are a few things in this recipe that are not good for dogs, so I substituted them for things they could digest. I took out the all-purpose flour, cornmeal, salt, sugar & butter and replaced them with Whole-Wheat flour, honey, and peanut butter. I didn't bother cutting the cookies with a cookie cutter, but rather rolled them into bite-size balls and flattened them into discs. My dogs were "sitting pretty" for them before I even got them into the oven!
If you love your dogs, and they are a part of your family, DON'T feed these to them. Not if you care. We read labels to take care of our own health, so why would we feed our dogs just anything. I've switched to Blue Wilderness. The ingredients in that are: Salmon,Chicken Meal,Potatoes,Chicken Fat (preserved with Mixed Tocopherols),Flaxseed (source of Omega 3 and 6 Fatty Acids),Calcium Ascorbate (source of Vitamin C),Vitamin E Supplement,Salt,Calcium Carbonate.
Wheat Flour, Wheat Bran, Meat and Bone Meal, Milk, Wheat Germ, Beef Fat (Preserved with BHA), Salt, Natural Flavor, Dicalcium Phosphate, Calcium Carbonate, Brewer's Dried Yeast, Malted Barley Flour, Sodium Metabisulfite (Used As A Preservative), Choline Chloride, Minerals (Ferrous Sulfate, Zinc Oxide, Manganous Oxide, Copper Sulfate, Calcium Iodate, Sodium Selenite), Vitamins (Vitamin E Supplement, Vitamin A Supplement, Niacin Supplement, D-Calcium Pantothenate, Riboflavin Supplement, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Vitamin D3 Supplement, Folic Acid, Biotin, Vitamin B12 Supplement), BHA (Used As A Preservative).
Cleaning the Cutters - You want to clean your dog cookie cutters as soon as your dog biscuits are in the oven. Using warm water and mild soap is usually all you'll need. Once they are washed, place them on a clean baking sheet and pop them into the oven for a couple minutes. This will help them to dry completely and avoid rust. Once they are cooled, they can be stored.
Dog-biscuit is a hard and well-baked mass of coarse, yet clean and wholesome flour, of an inferior kind to that known as sailors' biscuit; and this latter substance, indeed, would be the best substitute for the former with which we are acquainted. A bag of dog-biscuit of five shillings' value, will be an ample supply for a yard-dog during the year: it should be soaked in water, or " pot liquor," for an hour or two ; and if no meat be at hand, a little dripping or lard may be added to it while softening, which will make a relishing meal at a trifling cost. We have for many years known the utility of the plan thus advocated, and we earnestly recommend all who value the safety of the community and their own (to say nothing of the happiness of the canine race), to make trial of the rational and feasible plan which we have detailed." (1841)[12]
- Exclusions: ORIJEN, ACANA, Taste of the Wild, Hill's Pet Nutrition food and treats (Hill's Prescription Diet, Hill's Science Diet, Hill's Ideal Balance and Hill's Bioactive Recipe); Purina brands (Pro Plan, Muse, Beyond and Tidy Cats); Petsafe Brands (PetSafe, SportDOG, Frolicat, Drinkwell, Solvit', ScoopFree, Pet Loo, Gentle Leader, Mr. Herzher's and Piddle Place); Educator E-Collars; Playology; Dollar per Gallon tanks, 50% off or more tanks; select Precious Cat litter products; select Zilla Critter Cages; WholeHearted Memberships, Repeat Delivery orders and subscriptions; out-of-stock items, prior purchases, Donations, Petco Gift Cards and eGift Cards.
Thank you to the readers who have mentioned the issue with using bacon fat for dogs. A trace amount of bacon grease (two tablespoons divided amongst 30 biscuits = less than 1 gram of bacon fat per serving) shouldn’t be a concern. Of course, we’re not veterinarians over here, so please check with your vet or use an alternative type of oil if you are concerned.
This post totally cracked me up! Mainly because I have been thinking of making little pup treats for 2 weeks now. I’ve been hooked on Diane’s Gingie cookies (see OvenHug for the best gingie recipe eh=vah) and making them non-stop. Our finicky little chihuahua mix loves sharing bites with me. I want to make a gluten free version of my gingies so that our senior pup, Oscar can also join us – he has sensitive tummy issues. I just need to find a bone shaped cookie cutter and we’re in business. Thanks for the laughs. Your pup cookies look amazin’! Thanks for sharing. xo

In Spain, "pan de perro" is mentioned as early as 1623 in a play by Lope de Vega.[3] It is used here in the sense of giving someone blows; to "give dog's bread" to someone could mean anything from mistreating them to killing them.[4] The latter meaning refers to a special bread (also called zarazas) made with ground glass, poison and needles and intended to kill dogs.[5]
I didn’t realize you could make dog treats with only 2 ingredients, That’s awesome! All of the recipes sound great. I read some of the other posts, and I’m borrowing one of the ideas. My daughter is in a Girl Scout troop and her troop’s project is to volunteer at a shelter. I will check with the shelter and see if we can bring homemade treats. Thanks for all of the ideas!
Chicken, Soy Grits, Sugar, Corn Starch, Salt, Rice Flour, Dicalcium Phosphate, Propylene Glycol, Guar Gum, Natural Smoke Flavor, Lactic Acid, Garlic Powder, Potassium Sorbate (Used as a Preservative), Minerals (Ferrous Sulfate, Zinc Oxide, Manganous Oxide, Copper Sulfate, Calcium Iodate, Sodium Selenite), Vitamins (Vitamin E Supplement, Vitamin A Supplement, Niacin Supplement, D-Calcium Pantothenate, Riboflavin Supplement, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Thiamine Mononitrate, Vitamin D3 Supplement, Folic Acid, Biotin, Vitamin B12 Supplement), Sodium Nitrite (for Color Retention), BHA (Used as a Preservative).

This post totally cracked me up! Mainly because I have been thinking of making little pup treats for 2 weeks now. I’ve been hooked on Diane’s Gingie cookies (see OvenHug for the best gingie recipe eh=vah) and making them non-stop. Our finicky little chihuahua mix loves sharing bites with me. I want to make a gluten free version of my gingies so that our senior pup, Oscar can also join us – he has sensitive tummy issues. I just need to find a bone shaped cookie cutter and we’re in business. Thanks for the laughs. Your pup cookies look amazin’! Thanks for sharing. xo


I think this may be laced with doggie drugs or something...my dogs can't ever get enough of it & will stop at nothing for a dog treat. Seriously. They almost smothered me to death just today over the possibility of getting a dog treat when I asked the question, "Whooooo wants a cookie?" Both dogs (a pushy boxer & a bossy Westie), decided today that, instead of calmly following me back to the area where treats are kept, they would throw their bodies upon mine & attempt murder in the 1st degree by smothering me with what I can only assume they wanted me to believe & THINK were puppy kisses. Hmph. Puppy kisses, my elbow.
Frittatas have long been my go-to solution anytime I need to use up the sad-looking produce, wilting herbs, and little nubs of cheese in my fridge. It’s not often I make them with a plan — until now. Inspired by my favorite cheesy dip and the warm spring weather, I came up with a frittata loaded with garlicky marinated artichoke hearts, earthy baby spinach, salty Parm, and rich sour cream. I knew it would be good, but it went above and beyond all of my expectations.
Wheat Flour, Wheat Bran, Meat and Bone Meal, Beef Fat (Preserved with BHA), Poultry By-Product Meal, Wheat Germ, Chicken Meal, Salt, Bacon Fat, Dicalcium Phosphate, Titanium Dioxide (Color), Brewers Dried Yeast, Malted Barley Flour, Iron Oxide (Color), Choline Chloride, Minerals (Ferrous Sulfate, Zinc Oxide, Manganous Oxide, Copper Sulfate, Calcium Iodate, Sodium Selenite), Vitamins (Vitamin E Supplement, Vitamin A Supplement, Niacin Supplement, D-Calcium Pantothenate, Riboflavin Supplement, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Vitamin D3 Supplement, Folic Acid, Biotin, Vitamin B12 Supplement), Sodium Metabisulfite, Red 40, BHA (Used as a Preservative), Blue 1. 
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