Welcome to Next Week’s Meal Plan! I want to help you find inspiration and ease some of the pain points that come with getting dinner on the table night after night, whether you’re cooking for one or a family of eight. That’s why, as promised, this series is shifting — every week I’ll be answering reader requests and sharing meal plans that you want to see.It’s not too late! What type of meal plans would you like to see?
Dog Treat Dough - One thing that you need to consider when choosing cutters is the thickness of your dough. If it contains rolled oats, carob chips, or another chunky ingredient, you want to use very simple shaped cutters like hearts or circles. If your dough is simple and has smooth ingredients, like the turkey wheat free dog treats, you can use shapes that have more detail since the detail will be evident after the biscuits are baked.
My husky loves milk bones. We give them as treats for going in her crate or getting back from long walks, etc. She’s a 55 pound husky. I was breaking the large size in half for her so I figured I would just get the medium so I didn’t have to break them. However, I feel like the mediums are so small compared to the large, they almost feel smaller than when I was giving her half a large. The product is fine but I’m unhappy with how big a difference in size there is when moving between medium and large.
It’s also common to find by-products and fillers (check the labels of any treats you might have in the cupboard) in dog biscuits rather than natural, organic or high-quality ingredients. When you make small batches of your own doggie biscuits, there’s no need for extra additives or preservatives, another great reason to tie on an apron and get creative in the kitchen.
I’ve been making these for a long time now. My dog, Lola, knows by the smell when I’m baking for her and is in the kitchen the whole time! To make it easier, I use a pizza cutter and make 1x3” long strips instead of the bone shape. It is much faster with less rolling and these strips fit very nicely into Lola’s Kong. I use all natural peanut butter, and if I remember, get it freshly ground at the grocery store. I also buy the real Ceylon cinnamon to avoid any coumarin overdose if I give her too many treats.
Soft & chewy Buddy Biscuits are palatable with no crunch. An excellent choice for all dogs, especially older dogs or smaller dogs who prefer a softer treat. Along with indulging your pup, Buddy Soft & Chewy treats are also perfect for training, with a low calorie count and chock full of flavor to keep your dog motivated. Buddy Biscuits are also oven baked in the USA with only quality, recognizable ingredients. Healthy dog treats made with quality ingredients and natural peanut butter. Palatable, chewy dog treats perfect for older dogs. Baked in USA only. Contain no added corn, soy, fillers,artificial colors, flavors and artificial preservatives
Fantastic list! I loved every recipe, until I read #23. I don’t care how little it is, bacon is not good for any animal (although it’s one of MY favorite foods and I’ll eat it, but I won’t give it to my dogs). I read one blogger justify bacon in their dog treat recipe by saying that for the number of treats that their recipe provided, one piece of bacon wasn’t going to hurt a dog. That may be true, but it’s not worth it. Boiled chicken might be used instead. I guarantee dogs would love it, and it would be safer for them. Just as a reminder, the American Kennel Club states:
There aren't a lot of soft treats suitable for older dogs that have few remaining teeth, mine is such a dog...she loves them...I looked at the soft treats found in the store, many, many of them oddly contain garlic which is listed as bad for dogs....using such treats not knowing that, mine lost a 3" patch of fur...I threw them away and switched to this treat as well as ceaser treats...her fur has grown back and all seems well...as for flavor, I gave them a 5, not because I have eaten them but again, my dog likes them lol
Dog-biscuit is a hard and well-baked mass of coarse, yet clean and wholesome flour, of an inferior kind to that known as sailors' biscuit; and this latter substance, indeed, would be the best substitute for the former with which we are acquainted. A bag of dog-biscuit of five shillings' value, will be an ample supply for a yard-dog during the year: it should be soaked in water, or " pot liquor," for an hour or two ; and if no meat be at hand, a little dripping or lard may be added to it while softening, which will make a relishing meal at a trifling cost. We have for many years known the utility of the plan thus advocated, and we earnestly recommend all who value the safety of the community and their own (to say nothing of the happiness of the canine race), to make trial of the rational and feasible plan which we have detailed." (1841)[12]
In Spain, "pan de perro" is mentioned as early as 1623 in a play by Lope de Vega.[3] It is used here in the sense of giving someone blows; to "give dog's bread" to someone could mean anything from mistreating them to killing them.[4] The latter meaning refers to a special bread (also called zarazas) made with ground glass, poison and needles and intended to kill dogs.[5]
If you love your dogs, and they are a part of your family, DON'T feed these to them. Not if you care. We read labels to take care of our own health, so why would we feed our dogs just anything. I've switched to Blue Wilderness. The ingredients in that are: Salmon,Chicken Meal,Potatoes,Chicken Fat (preserved with Mixed Tocopherols),Flaxseed (source of Omega 3 and 6 Fatty Acids),Calcium Ascorbate (source of Vitamin C),Vitamin E Supplement,Salt,Calcium Carbonate.
Whether you are training your doggie, playing with it, or simply want to cuddle up with it, a doggie treat is always a great tool to make your pooch feel appreciated and loved while also learning to associate what it has done to something that is pleasant, positive, and very rewarding. After all, they don’t call it positive reinforcement for nothing. Giving our dogs treats can also help in the promotion of optimum dental health. And if you’re ready to find out what the 10 best dog treats in the market today are, then hold onto your seats as we’re laying them all out for you.

In Spain, "pan de perro" is mentioned as early as 1623 in a play by Lope de Vega.[3] It is used here in the sense of giving someone blows; to "give dog's bread" to someone could mean anything from mistreating them to killing them.[4] The latter meaning refers to a special bread (also called zarazas) made with ground glass, poison and needles and intended to kill dogs.[5]
I can see my next challenge will be trying to get into the Doggie Treats jar without Cody hearing me! Not only were these really easy to make using a food processor, but they are absolutely delicious! Healthy, too! Looking at the recipe I just realized that I forgot the salt, although I did use the suggested peanut butter instead of butter and all whole wheat flour instead of half all purpose flour. I used the parsley, but didn't have the mint. I could see rolling the dough into a log, chilling and slicing to make crackers. They are really delicious! Thank you for the recipe so Cody can get some "good for you" treats, too! This is "our" favorite dog bone recipe so far!

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In a medium bowl, stir together the whole wheat flour, powdered milk, wheat germ, and beef bouillon granules. Stir in the bacon grease and egg. Add ice water 1 tablespoon at a time until dough is wet enough to stick together. On a lightly floured surface, roll the dough out to 1/2 inch thickness and cut with cookie cutters. Place biscuits 1 inch apart onto an ungreased baking sheet.

Beef, Chicken, Soy Grits, Sugar, Corn Starch, Filet Mignon, Dicalcium Phosphate, Salt, Rice Flour, Propylene Glycol, Natural Smoke Flavor, Guar Gum, Lactic Acid, Garlic Powder, Potassium Sorbate (Used as a Preservative), Vitamins (Vitamin E Supplement, Vitamin A Supplement, Niacin Supplement, D-Calcium Pantothenate, Riboflavin Supplement, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Thiamine Mononitrate, Vitamin D3 Supplement, Folic Acid, Biotin, Vitamin B12 Supplement), Minerals (Ferrous Sulfate, Zinc Oxide, Manganous Oxide, Copper Sulfate, Calcium Iodate, Sodium Selenite), Red 40, Sodium Nitrite (for Color Retention), Yellow 5, BHA (Used as a Preservative), Blue 2.


Hi Christi, I actually came here baking advice. Your cookies look awesome. I make my own also and am trying to make a business out of it but I’m having trouble as I am a real amatuer baker. My ingredients are 3 cups wheat flour, 2 tsp baking powder, 2 eggs, 1/2 cup chicken broth, 1/2 cup rolled oats, 1/4 sweet potato and 1 cup of pumkin. Bake 350 for 1/2 hr then rest in cooling oven 1 hr. They come out crunchy like i want but easilly broken. When rolling out the dough it is very dry and big cracks around the edge. Very labor intensive to get a batch baked!
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