I didn’t realize you could make dog treats with only 2 ingredients, That’s awesome! All of the recipes sound great. I read some of the other posts, and I’m borrowing one of the ideas. My daughter is in a Girl Scout troop and her troop’s project is to volunteer at a shelter. I will check with the shelter and see if we can bring homemade treats. Thanks for all of the ideas!

Wow! I have three dogs, A Chihuahua, a King Charles Cavalier and a St. Bernard. They all went wild over these biscuits. I bought a tin of three different size biscuit cutters at Michaels. I'm afraid I'm going to have to search for much bigger one for my St.Bernard! They were very easy to make and rolled out beautifully without any refrigeration. I didn't have fresh parsley or mint, so I just used dried parsely (we were in the middle of a blizzard). I just hope I can keep these guys stocked up now!


“In 2015, the World Health Organization found that processed meats such as bacon and sausage were known carcinogens linked to cancer. Bacon is an incredibly rich and fatty food with a high salt content, which can prove to be too much for a dog’s stomach to handle. Eating a large amount can cause pancreatitis, which can be fatal.” [http://www.akc.org/expert-advice/nutrition/natural-foods/can-dogs-eat-pork/]”
There aren't a lot of soft treats suitable for older dogs that have few remaining teeth, mine is such a dog...she loves them...I looked at the soft treats found in the store, many, many of them oddly contain garlic which is listed as bad for dogs....using such treats not knowing that, mine lost a 3" patch of fur...I threw them away and switched to this treat as well as ceaser treats...her fur has grown back and all seems well...as for flavor, I gave them a 5, not because I have eaten them but again, my dog likes them lol
I can't say enough about this company! Yes, my dog has enjoyed their product (all flavors) and yes, I appreciate that they always seem fresh and soft so I can easily break them into small pieces for my shih tzu....but the main reason is I like dealing with this company. Both times I have needed to return something (once I made a mistake on my order and now, just after I ordered two more bags, my vet has placed my dog on a restrictive diet and she can no longer have these treats) they have just refunded my money ....no questions, no returning the product, no hassle! It's so refreshing! I will continue to recommend Buddy Biscuits even though Cali can no longer eat them.

My daughter volunteers at a dog rescue and we want to make several different batches and bring them to share in celebrating her birthday in a couple months. I LOVE the variety of recipes and especially ones for those dogs with grain allergies or that are diabetic! My question is, will the treats still be good if we make ahead of time and freeze them until closer to the big day? Sadly, I’m not much of a cook so I am not familiar with what freezes well and what wouldn’t.
Wheat Flour, Wheat Bran, Meat and Bone Meal, Milk, Wheat Germ, Beef Fat (Preserved with BHA), Salt, Natural Flavor, Dicalcium Phosphate, Calcium Carbonate, Brewer's Dried Yeast, Malted Barley Flour, Sodium Metabisulfite (Used As A Preservative), Choline Chloride, Minerals (Ferrous Sulfate, Zinc Oxide, Manganous Oxide, Copper Sulfate, Calcium Iodate, Sodium Selenite), Vitamins (Vitamin E Supplement, Vitamin A Supplement, Niacin Supplement, D-Calcium Pantothenate, Riboflavin Supplement, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Vitamin D3 Supplement, Folic Acid, Biotin, Vitamin B12 Supplement), BHA (Used As A Preservative).
More than 70 years ago, in a little shop in London an electrician named James Spratt conducted experiments which led to the production of Spratt's Patent—a scientifically blended dog food. It was the first attempt to lift the dog out of the class of scavenger which he had occupied from caveman times. The market was untouched, and in those early days, Spratt's Patent secured a bull-dog grip on it that it has never relinquished, despite the fact that in the past seventy years many competitors have tried to wrest the leadership from them. (1920)[15]

My dogs used to love all of the soft and chewy Buddy Biscuits flavors. They were easy to break up into soft bits that my tiny and toothless dogs could eat. Around the fall of 2018, I noticed that the treats were arriving hard and not chewy. I assumed they were stale, but after trying more bags, I realized that the company has changed them. They should not label them as soft and chewy anymore. Also, the bags also used to state that the treats are "grain-free", while wheat flour was the 2nd ingredient on the bag! They have removed that claim from the bags, but it made me wonder about the company's awareness of their product, if they have made multiple mistakes in regards to claims and labeling. I've found another truly soft treat here on Amazon that my dogs prefer, and are able to eat.


Usually soft and chewy Buddy Biscuits are just that, soft and chewy. Not these. They were so hard and stale that my dog who normally won't eat any treats except the soft and chewy Buddy Biscuits, just looked at me with a glare as though to say, Are you kidding me?! So I tried to give them away to dogs I saw loose in the park. Again no deal. Amazon is great on some things but not Buddy Biscuits. Save your money and buy locally where you'll get the fresh, soft and chewy Buddy Biscuits.

I think this may be laced with doggie drugs or something...my dogs can't ever get enough of it & will stop at nothing for a dog treat. Seriously. They almost smothered me to death just today over the possibility of getting a dog treat when I asked the question, "Whooooo wants a cookie?" Both dogs (a pushy boxer & a bossy Westie), decided today that, instead of calmly following me back to the area where treats are kept, they would throw their bodies upon mine & attempt murder in the 1st degree by smothering me with what I can only assume they wanted me to believe & THINK were puppy kisses. Hmph. Puppy kisses, my elbow.
One of the pleasures of cooking a ham for a large gathering, obviously outside of eating it, is that the city hams we glaze and bake for holidays are already cooked. This should take the guesswork out of cooking a ham at home, right? But because most hams are quite large and have spiral cuts and giant bones to contend with, it can be hard to tell when a ham is actually “done” cooking. Here’s everything you need to know about ham temperatures for reheating and serving.
Kitchn’s Delicious Links column highlights recipes we’re excited about from the bloggers we love. Follow along every weekday as we post our favorites.Flank steak is a great way to mix up proteins during the week, so your dinner isn’t all chicken, every day. It’s a comparatively inexpensive cut of beef, and I find it way easier to cook than chicken, because you don’t need to worry nearly as much about getting the meat to the exact right temperature.

Temperatures are rising, flowers are blooming, and the spring season is now in full force. And doesn’t it truly just feel like meringue time? Lots of fresh eggs mean more whites for cooking and baking — including light-as-air meringue cookies and luscious, meringue-topped pie. And when it comes to the latter, we are always on the hunt for ways to make meringue as light, fluffy, and luxurious as possible.
Made these for a school fundraiser -'bake sale' last year. I packaged them in bags with dog bones on them and tied with a red ribbon. Wasn't sure how they would go over, made about 30 bags. Sold every single one with people asking for more. One woman called me this year to order 20 bags LOL. My dog loves them and all the dogs in the neighborhood do too.
Molly gives her seal of approval. I am going with 5 stars. The ingredients list of actually impressive although the usual colors and preservatives are in there. But these are fortified with many vitamins so they aren't empty snacks and beef is the first ingredient. I also checked and they are made in the USA. THAT's a relief. These are a great choice for even picky dogs. They aren't too hard nor are they so soft that they're gone in an instant (unless you have a really huge dog who gobbled down things). I think most dogs will enjoy these bones.
By most accounts, the history of the industry begins with a man named James Spratt. An electrician from Cincinnati, Spratt had patented a new type of lightning conductor in 1850. Later in the decade, he traveled to England to sell it. According to industry lore, he had a quayside epiphany in London when he saw a group of dogs eating discarded hardtack, the cheap, tough biscuits carried on ships and known to sailors as "molar breakers." The first major chunk of today's pet industry was born.
The case for the plaintiffs was that for many years they and their predecessor, James Spratt, had manufactured and sold, under patents of 1868 and 1881, meat biscuits for feeding dogs, the full name or description of which is " Spratt's Patent Meat Fibrine Dog Cakes," but which are often designated by them, and are commonly known in the trade, as " Spratt's Fibrine Biscuits," or " Spratt's Dog Biscuits," or " Spratt's Dog Cakes," or " Spratt's Meat Biscuits," or " Spratt's Patent Biscuits," or " Patent Dog Biscuits," all which, as the plaintiffs asserted, indicated biscuits of their manufacture and no other. These biscuits are made in a square form, and each is stamped with the words " Spratt's Patent" and with a + in the centre. It was alleged that " the biscuits have been found most valuable as food for dogs, and have acquired a great reputation." They are in large demand, and the plaintiffs make considerable profits from the sale thereof, which profits would be considerably larger but that, as they alleged, fraudulent imitations are frequently palmed off upon the public as the biscuits of the plaintiffs, and then it was charged that the defendant had, in fraud of the plaintiffs and of the public, " been selling to the public, as genuine dog biscuits of the plaintiffs' manufacture, biscuits which are not of the plaintiffs' manufacture, but are a fraudulent imitation thereof as to shape and appearance, and which do not contain the ingredients of the plaintiffs' biscuits." Then several instances were stated in which persons who sent to the shop of the defendant to ask for Spratt's dog biscuits received other biscuits similar, as was alleged, to the plaintiffs' in size, appearance, and weight, the only difference being that, in lieu of the words " Spratt's Patent " and the cross, the biscuits sold were stamped with a hexagon and the words " American meat."
The story of Milk-Bone Biscuits began in 1908, when they were created by F.H. Bennett Biscuit Company in a small bakery in New York City. Today, Milk-Bone offers a wide selection of dog treats, catering to dogs of all shapes and sizes. The biscuits are baked with premium ingredients and fortified with minerals and vitamins, making them a wholesome, nutritionally sound choice for your canine friend. With more than 20 varieties of Milk-Bone treats to choose from, it’s easy to find one that shows your love in exactly the right way.
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