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Cleaning the Cutters - You want to clean your dog cookie cutters as soon as your dog biscuits are in the oven. Using warm water and mild soap is usually all you'll need. Once they are washed, place them on a clean baking sheet and pop them into the oven for a couple minutes. This will help them to dry completely and avoid rust. Once they are cooled, they can be stored.
If your fur baby has a sweet tooth he will love these chews, and oatmeal adds protein and is good for digestion. To make these chewy treats, puree 1/4 C. diced peaches, 1 tbsp. canola oil, 1 tbsp. molasses, 1/4 tsp. vanilla and 1/8 C. water. Combine the puree with 2 C. rolled oats, 1/2 C. water, 1 C. flour and 1 tsp. cinnamon. Scoop spoon-sized dollops on to a lightly greased baking sheet, press them flat with the back of the spoon, and bake at 350 degrees Fahrenheit for 15 minutes. These chewy cookie treats can be stored for two weeks in the refrigerator or six months in the freezer.
Bake these healthy treats a shorter time to keep them chewy, or a little longer for a crispy outside and chewy center. Combine a pound of ground beef, turkey or chicken liver with 1 C. corn meal, 1 1/2 C. flour, 1 tsp. anise seed and 1/2 tsp. salt. Spread into a greased baking pan, bake at 350 degrees for 20 minutes, and slice into squares when cool. Substitute fennel for anise if needed. Add an egg, or grated apple or carrot for more nutrition and flavor. Any ground organ meat, such as heart, can be used in place of liver. Dogs love these chewy brownies with nearly any kind of meat.

Frittatas have long been my go-to solution anytime I need to use up the sad-looking produce, wilting herbs, and little nubs of cheese in my fridge. It’s not often I make them with a plan — until now. Inspired by my favorite cheesy dip and the warm spring weather, I came up with a frittata loaded with garlicky marinated artichoke hearts, earthy baby spinach, salty Parm, and rich sour cream. I knew it would be good, but it went above and beyond all of my expectations.

More than 70 years ago, in a little shop in London an electrician named James Spratt conducted experiments which led to the production of Spratt's Patent—a scientifically blended dog food. It was the first attempt to lift the dog out of the class of scavenger which he had occupied from caveman times. The market was untouched, and in those early days, Spratt's Patent secured a bull-dog grip on it that it has never relinquished, despite the fact that in the past seventy years many competitors have tried to wrest the leadership from them. (1920)[15]
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