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My dog, a boston terrier, loves this treat. They are small enough that I can give her a couple, so I like to use them when training for tricks to reward her for doing something particularly hard. They are more exciting than training treats but can still be eaten quickly. This is a huge bin, a great price, and the container is air tight. There are a lot of little bugs where I live that like to infiltrate my dog food, so I actually keep the container every time I empty one and use it to store dog food, treats, etc. The wide mouth to the jar means it's very easy to get in and out of.

By most accounts, the history of the industry begins with a man named James Spratt. An electrician from Cincinnati, Spratt had patented a new type of lightning conductor in 1850. Later in the decade, he traveled to England to sell it. According to industry lore, he had a quayside epiphany in London when he saw a group of dogs eating discarded hardtack, the cheap, tough biscuits carried on ships and known to sailors as "molar breakers." The first major chunk of today's pet industry was born.


I bought this for my 20lb dog who looooooves cheese. I like it because I can easily break it into small pieces for training (one piece is about 1.5" and that's too big for him as a training treat), and my dog who is allergic to a lot of things doesn't seem to have any reaction to this one. However, he isn't crazy about it (he likes it though!), which means its taste is not as cheesy as I hoped. We are in the middle of an intense training period and I need to have different levels of treats. I wanted this one to be the highest prize but unfortunately it didn't work that way.

Spratt dominated the American market until 1907, when F. H. Bennett, whose own dog biscuits were faring poorly against those of the larger company, had the idea of making them in the shape of a bone. "His 'Maltoid Milk-Bones' were such a success that for the next fifteen years Bennett's Milk-Bone dominated the commercial dog food market in America."[18] In 1931, the National Biscuit Company, now known as Nabisco, bought the company.
Lifting the Cut Outs - Once you have cut out as many dog biscuits as you can, it's time to transfer the cookies to the baking sheet. Start by pulling away the excess dough from around the cut outs. Place the unused dough back into your bowl to be rolled out. Gently lift the cookie away from the parchment paper or flour covered surface with a metal or thin spatula.
On Wednesday last, in the Quean's Bench Division of the High Court, before Lord Coleridge and a special jury. Spratt's Patent Company claimed an injunction against a Mr. Warnett, a general dealer at St. Albans, who, they alleged, was selling as theirs certain meat biscuits for dogs not of their manufacture. They also asked for an account of profits, and damages and costs.
Lori Lapierre holds a Bachelor of Arts and Science in public relations/communications. For 17 years, she worked for a Fortune 500 company before purchasing a business and starting a family. She is a regular freelancer for "Living Light News," an award-winning national publication. Her past writing experience includes school news reporting, church drama, in-house business articles and a self-published mystery, "Duty Free Murder."

This recipe seems a bit ingredient heavy and a tad cumbersome for dog biscuits, however it is absolutely worth the effort. A friend and I made these, and not only are they really tastey for humans, the dogs we "experimented" on with these really enjoyed them too. An added bonus, the mint and parsley in the recipe absolutely caused our dogs to have fresher breath. This completely sealed the deal with this recipe, and we will make it again.
My dog loves these! In fact, she now snubs her nose at Milkbones. I omit the sugar, sub the butter with peanut butter, omit the mint and instead double the parsley, which I often just buy dried. I also don't roll them out and use my hands instead to make tiny flat disks--I have a small dog. Great recipe. Makes enough for a two-three month supply for my pooch.
We have a half Siberian Husky/half German Shepherd mix with loads of energy. So much so that getting him to slow down and listen is a task. Then we found Purina Alpo Variety Snaps Little Bites Dog Treats that worked perfectly in gaining his undivided attention. However over the years, he's become older and not so excited over these treats, too used to them. So to change up things, we bought this Milk-bone Soft Chewy Dog Treats, and oh my gosh. He's back to learning all new tricks again just for a small taste of these. What is so funny now, we offer him the Little Bites Treat square and he's all excited and grabs it, but then drops it immediately while sitting in the at attention pose with no movement at all waiting for this new Milk-bone Soft Chewy Dog Treat..... Once we give him that, he is all posed for another trick/training lesson. Of course if we leave the other square treat laying, he will quickly snatch it up after the Milk-bone treat is gone. But we are so happy he is happy and attentive with these. Thank you!
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