Lifting the Cut Outs - Once you have cut out as many dog biscuits as you can, it's time to transfer the cookies to the baking sheet. Start by pulling away the excess dough from around the cut outs. Place the unused dough back into your bowl to be rolled out. Gently lift the cookie away from the parchment paper or flour covered surface with a metal or thin spatula.

Bake these healthy treats a shorter time to keep them chewy, or a little longer for a crispy outside and chewy center. Combine a pound of ground beef, turkey or chicken liver with 1 C. corn meal, 1 1/2 C. flour, 1 tsp. anise seed and 1/2 tsp. salt. Spread into a greased baking pan, bake at 350 degrees for 20 minutes, and slice into squares when cool. Substitute fennel for anise if needed. Add an egg, or grated apple or carrot for more nutrition and flavor. Any ground organ meat, such as heart, can be used in place of liver. Dogs love these chewy brownies with nearly any kind of meat.

This dog treat recipe is perfect if you’ve got some fun cookie cutters on hand. And since it’s peanut butter based it’s pretty much guaranteed to be a hit with your dog. I have yet to meet a dog who doesn’t go bonkers for PB. For this recipe you’ll need 2 cups of whole wheat flout, 1 tablespoon baking powder, 1 cup unsalted natural peanut butter and 1 cup skim milk.


These do something bad to my dog. Not sure what the ingredient could be, but it's enough that i have finally given up on these. I like them for the texture, but they make my dog extremely hyped up and almost manic. It's like watching a dog on cocaine. Scares me. No thanks. This time, I will remember. I had tried this once before and forgotten until the same reaction occurred.
I love this list! First time making dog treats, didn’t have all the ingredients for one recipe so I used this as inspiration. I used peanut butter, eggs, flour, honey, and vegetable broth to make soft, chewy dog biscuits and used a heart cookie cutter. My pugs & chihuahua, and my boyfriend’s goldens loved em! Even tried one myself heheh – turned out like lightly sweetened peanut butter cookies.
I can't say enough about this company! Yes, my dog has enjoyed their product (all flavors) and yes, I appreciate that they always seem fresh and soft so I can easily break them into small pieces for my shih tzu....but the main reason is I like dealing with this company. Both times I have needed to return something (once I made a mistake on my order and now, just after I ordered two more bags, my vet has placed my dog on a restrictive diet and she can no longer have these treats) they have just refunded my money ....no questions, no returning the product, no hassle! It's so refreshing! I will continue to recommend Buddy Biscuits even though Cali can no longer eat them.
In a medium bowl, stir together the whole wheat flour, powdered milk, wheat germ, and beef bouillon granules. Stir in the bacon grease and egg. Add ice water 1 tablespoon at a time until dough is wet enough to stick together. On a lightly floured surface, roll the dough out to 1/2 inch thickness and cut with cookie cutters. Place biscuits 1 inch apart onto an ungreased baking sheet.

I bought these Milk-Bone MaroSnacks previously and my Min Pin (as well as the poodle next door ;) loved them, so I purchased them again and for some reason this time, they are making my dog sick with diarrhea. I just had her to the vet and she got a clean bill of health and she only gets the 'growling stomach' & diarrhea when I give her one of these snacks. I don't know if they changed the ingredients or what?


I must agree with previous reviewers that this is not a healthy biscuit recipe for dogs. Our bulldogs have many allergies, so I modified the ingredients and they came out great (just ask our happy pups)! Substituted both the all-purpose flour and whole wheat flour for brown rice flour, eliminated corn meal (too hard for dogs to digest) and used 2-1/2 cups of old fashioned oats. Eliminated wheat germ & brown sugar and used 1/2 cup of all-natural peanut butter with 1 Tbsp. honey. Eliminated salt and only used 1/2 stick of unsalted butter. My substitutions required more liquid, so I used 1-1/2 cups of chicken broth (instead of only 1 cup water). This recipe came out terrific...the whole house smelled like peanut butter cookies (^:

Meet my new favorite brunch dish: Hawaiian Roll Egg-in-a Hole. You might be familiar with egg-in-a-hole as a beloved childhood breakfast dish, but this version is easier to cook for a crowd, and delivers big on flavor. Serve this egg bake for family brunch, or whip it up when you’re feeding a hungry crowd. Here are my tricks for nailing it every time. At first glance, this recipe is pretty straightforward: Make a well in each roll, crack in an egg, and bake!
The case for the plaintiffs was that for many years they and their predecessor, James Spratt, had manufactured and sold, under patents of 1868 and 1881, meat biscuits for feeding dogs, the full name or description of which is " Spratt's Patent Meat Fibrine Dog Cakes," but which are often designated by them, and are commonly known in the trade, as " Spratt's Fibrine Biscuits," or " Spratt's Dog Biscuits," or " Spratt's Dog Cakes," or " Spratt's Meat Biscuits," or " Spratt's Patent Biscuits," or " Patent Dog Biscuits," all which, as the plaintiffs asserted, indicated biscuits of their manufacture and no other. These biscuits are made in a square form, and each is stamped with the words " Spratt's Patent" and with a + in the centre. It was alleged that " the biscuits have been found most valuable as food for dogs, and have acquired a great reputation." They are in large demand, and the plaintiffs make considerable profits from the sale thereof, which profits would be considerably larger but that, as they alleged, fraudulent imitations are frequently palmed off upon the public as the biscuits of the plaintiffs, and then it was charged that the defendant had, in fraud of the plaintiffs and of the public, " been selling to the public, as genuine dog biscuits of the plaintiffs' manufacture, biscuits which are not of the plaintiffs' manufacture, but are a fraudulent imitation thereof as to shape and appearance, and which do not contain the ingredients of the plaintiffs' biscuits." Then several instances were stated in which persons who sent to the shop of the defendant to ask for Spratt's dog biscuits received other biscuits similar, as was alleged, to the plaintiffs' in size, appearance, and weight, the only difference being that, in lieu of the words " Spratt's Patent " and the cross, the biscuits sold were stamped with a hexagon and the words " American meat."
If your pup loves to chew, make your own chew strips with fresh chicken. Slice chicken breasts into 1/8" thick strips and dehydrate in an oven set to 200 degrees Fahrenheit for about two hours, or until the chicken is dried and chewy. Sprinkle with anise prior to drying for extra flavor. Turkey also can be substituted. Poultry chews make a nice alternative to rawhide treats, which could contain chemicals or preservatives. Store extra chews in the refrigerator or freezer. Chicken jerky can also be made in the microwave by cooking the strips for 20 minutes on medium power until they are chewy.

If your pup loves to chew, make your own chew strips with fresh chicken. Slice chicken breasts into 1/8" thick strips and dehydrate in an oven set to 200 degrees Fahrenheit for about two hours, or until the chicken is dried and chewy. Sprinkle with anise prior to drying for extra flavor. Turkey also can be substituted. Poultry chews make a nice alternative to rawhide treats, which could contain chemicals or preservatives. Store extra chews in the refrigerator or freezer. Chicken jerky can also be made in the microwave by cooking the strips for 20 minutes on medium power until they are chewy.

Wow! I have three dogs, A Chihuahua, a King Charles Cavalier and a St. Bernard. They all went wild over these biscuits. I bought a tin of three different size biscuit cutters at Michaels. I'm afraid I'm going to have to search for much bigger one for my St.Bernard! They were very easy to make and rolled out beautifully without any refrigeration. I didn't have fresh parsley or mint, so I just used dried parsely (we were in the middle of a blizzard). I just hope I can keep these guys stocked up now!
Chicken, Soy Grits, Sugar, Corn Starch, Salt, Rice Flour, Dicalcium Phosphate, Propylene Glycol, Guar Gum, Natural Smoke Flavor, Lactic Acid, Garlic Powder, Potassium Sorbate (Used as a Preservative), Minerals (Ferrous Sulfate, Zinc Oxide, Manganous Oxide, Copper Sulfate, Calcium Iodate, Sodium Selenite), Vitamins (Vitamin E Supplement, Vitamin A Supplement, Niacin Supplement, D-Calcium Pantothenate, Riboflavin Supplement, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Thiamine Mononitrate, Vitamin D3 Supplement, Folic Acid, Biotin, Vitamin B12 Supplement), Sodium Nitrite (for Color Retention), BHA (Used as a Preservative).
Thank you to the readers who have mentioned the issue with using bacon fat for dogs. A trace amount of bacon grease (two tablespoons divided amongst 30 biscuits = less than 1 gram of bacon fat per serving) shouldn’t be a concern. Of course, we’re not veterinarians over here, so please check with your vet or use an alternative type of oil if you are concerned.
My Jack Russell loved this, and for 5 years, we ignorantly fed these to her -- two or three a day -- thinking that they were harmless, and she certainly loved them. Then, one day, during a vet visit, we discovered her teeth were rotting. We couldn't determine what it could be because we tried desperately to keep her away from people food and THOUGHT we were doing right by her with her dog food -- and these "nutritious snacks". She had 12 teeth extracted that day. We didn't know then what we know now. Soon after, when we got our German Shepherd puppy, we were told to be very careful what we fed him, so we started reading labels, something that didn't register as important prior. Guess what we found on THIS label: THE THIRD INGREDIENT IS SUGAR. Nutritionists have long stated that the first 3-5 ingredients in a product are it's primary ingredients. SUGAR!!! I'd never buy products for myself where sugar was in the top five ingredients, so why in the name of all that's holy would I purchase it for my dog. In addition, two of the ingredients are colorants. My poor Jack Russell lost 12 teeth, and I now suspect this is why. If I could prove it was this product, I'd sue this company for her $1,000 dental bill.

My dog absolutely loves it! I've been looking for a good quality dog treat that's also economical because my pup deserves only the best (that I can afford on my sad college student budget). He's a small, 15lb dachshund-terrier-chihuahua mix and inhales small treats so I worry he'll choke on the ones meant for his size and I'd have to perform the heimlich on the tiny thing. So instead, I bought the Large size which are about the size of his paw and takes him a while to chew through. He loves chewing on things since he's still young so getting this size was perfect. No more inhaling treats, chewing through my stuff, and it keeps him busily happy. The box is huge and I got it at an amazing price compared to in-store and the option for his size were more expensive anyway so I recommend looking through all the sizes for the cheapest one because they always change regardless of the product size/weight.
Wheat Flour, Wheat Bran, Meat and Bone Meal, Milk, Wheat Germ, Beef Fat (Preserved with BHA), Salt, Natural Flavor, Dicalcium Phosphate, Calcium Carbonate, Brewer's Dried Yeast, Malted Barley Flour, Sodium Metabisulfite (Used As A Preservative), Choline Chloride, Minerals (Ferrous Sulfate, Zinc Oxide, Manganous Oxide, Copper Sulfate, Calcium Iodate, Sodium Selenite), Vitamins (Vitamin E Supplement, Vitamin A Supplement, Niacin Supplement, D-Calcium Pantothenate, Riboflavin Supplement, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Vitamin D3 Supplement, Folic Acid, Biotin, Vitamin B12 Supplement), BHA (Used As A Preservative).
To a dog, nothing says “great job” like a tasty treat. Whether he’s earned a reward for obeying commands, being a good boy, or simply being his lovable self, your pooch deserves the best. While many dog treats taste great, not all are healthy. As a daily part of your dog’s diet, choosing treats with a good balance of flavor and nutrition is essential. But with endless treats available, it can be difficult to know where to start. Does size matter? Is texture important? Which ingredients should you look for and which should you avoid? At BestReviews, we’re dedicated to giving our readers the answers they need to find the best buys. We research, analyze, and test products, seeking out expert advice and user feedback, too. And you won’t find any free samples in our labs. Every product we test is selected by us and purchased with our own funds. If choosing the best dog treat is driving you barking mad, you’ve come to the right place! No time to spare? Browse our five favorite dog treats in the matrix above. Or keep reading for our guide to finding the perfect dog treats for your best friend.
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