Of course, if you really want to make National Dog Biscuit Day a holiday to remember, grab all the options on this list, and a few more, bake some homemade treats, and have a great biscuit taste test with your canine companion on February 23rd! Find out which treat drives them wild and zero in on how to best reward them. After all, they deserve it!
My Jack Russell loved this, and for 5 years, we ignorantly fed these to her -- two or three a day -- thinking that they were harmless, and she certainly loved them. Then, one day, during a vet visit, we discovered her teeth were rotting. We couldn't determine what it could be because we tried desperately to keep her away from people food and THOUGHT we were doing right by her with her dog food -- and these "nutritious snacks". She had 12 teeth extracted that day. We didn't know then what we know now. Soon after, when we got our German Shepherd puppy, we were told to be very careful what we fed him, so we started reading labels, something that didn't register as important prior. Guess what we found on THIS label: THE THIRD INGREDIENT IS SUGAR. Nutritionists have long stated that the first 3-5 ingredients in a product are it's primary ingredients. SUGAR!!! I'd never buy products for myself where sugar was in the top five ingredients, so why in the name of all that's holy would I purchase it for my dog. In addition, two of the ingredients are colorants. My poor Jack Russell lost 12 teeth, and I now suspect this is why. If I could prove it was this product, I'd sue this company for her $1,000 dental bill.
More than 70 years ago, in a little shop in London an electrician named James Spratt conducted experiments which led to the production of Spratt's Patent—a scientifically blended dog food. It was the first attempt to lift the dog out of the class of scavenger which he had occupied from caveman times. The market was untouched, and in those early days, Spratt's Patent secured a bull-dog grip on it that it has never relinquished, despite the fact that in the past seventy years many competitors have tried to wrest the leadership from them. (1920)[15]

Dog-biscuit is a hard and well-baked mass of coarse, yet clean and wholesome flour, of an inferior kind to that known as sailors' biscuit; and this latter substance, indeed, would be the best substitute for the former with which we are acquainted. A bag of dog-biscuit of five shillings' value, will be an ample supply for a yard-dog during the year: it should be soaked in water, or " pot liquor," for an hour or two ; and if no meat be at hand, a little dripping or lard may be added to it while softening, which will make a relishing meal at a trifling cost. We have for many years known the utility of the plan thus advocated, and we earnestly recommend all who value the safety of the community and their own (to say nothing of the happiness of the canine race), to make trial of the rational and feasible plan which we have detailed." (1841)[12]
The point of homemade dog treats is to stay away from preservatives, chemicals, dyes and all the other nonsense. Be smart. Do extensive research on the ingredients you wish to use and the alternative to each of them. Even if you think your dog has a ‘tolerance’ for milk, you should use it regardless unless you 100% know of any additives. In that case I just take milk right out of the equation. Theres no need for it anyway.
In later years, dog biscuits began to be made of meat products and were sometimes treated as synonymous with dog food. In 1871, an ad appeared in Cassell's Illustrated Almanac for "SLATER'S MEAT BISCUIT FOR DOGS - Contains vegetable substances and about 25 per cent of Prepared Meat. It gives Dogs endurance, and without any other food will keep them in fine working condition."[13]

This Easter we were gifted a 22-pound ham (!!!) and while we had our share of Easter feasts, we’ve still got a decent amount left over. I’m not even a little bit mad, because I know I can freeze some for future use and that there are plenty of ways — big and small — that we can use it up this week. Here are 17 of my favorite recipes for using up leftover ham. City hams freeze incredibly well. My suggestion? Freeze the ham in different forms for future use.


The English dog biscuit appears to be a nineteenth-century innovation: "With this may be joined farinaceous and vegetable articles — oat-meal, fine-pollard, dog-biscuit, potatoes, carrots, parsnips" (1827);[10] "being in the neighbourhood of Maidenhead, I inspected Mr. Smith's dog-biscuit manufactory, and was surprised to find he has been for a long period manufacturing the enormous quantity of five tons a-week !" (1828)[11]
Bake these healthy treats a shorter time to keep them chewy, or a little longer for a crispy outside and chewy center. Combine a pound of ground beef, turkey or chicken liver with 1 C. corn meal, 1 1/2 C. flour, 1 tsp. anise seed and 1/2 tsp. salt. Spread into a greased baking pan, bake at 350 degrees for 20 minutes, and slice into squares when cool. Substitute fennel for anise if needed. Add an egg, or grated apple or carrot for more nutrition and flavor. Any ground organ meat, such as heart, can be used in place of liver. Dogs love these chewy brownies with nearly any kind of meat.
My husky loves milk bones. We give them as treats for going in her crate or getting back from long walks, etc. She’s a 55 pound husky. I was breaking the large size in half for her so I figured I would just get the medium so I didn’t have to break them. However, I feel like the mediums are so small compared to the large, they almost feel smaller than when I was giving her half a large. The product is fine but I’m unhappy with how big a difference in size there is when moving between medium and large.
This recipe seems a bit ingredient heavy and a tad cumbersome for dog biscuits, however it is absolutely worth the effort. A friend and I made these, and not only are they really tastey for humans, the dogs we "experimented" on with these really enjoyed them too. An added bonus, the mint and parsley in the recipe absolutely caused our dogs to have fresher breath. This completely sealed the deal with this recipe, and we will make it again.
I just bought my third tub of these MaroSnacks for my Yorkie..She generally doesn't like crunchy snacks preferring chewy ones but she does like these. They're small and have marrow inside which she obviously enjoys because she chews them right up rather than taking them upstairs to hide them. She hides her lesser liked treats for when she is really desperate I guess. Silly dog.
We have a half Siberian Husky/half German Shepherd mix with loads of energy. So much so that getting him to slow down and listen is a task. Then we found Purina Alpo Variety Snaps Little Bites Dog Treats that worked perfectly in gaining his undivided attention. However over the years, he's become older and not so excited over these treats, too used to them. So to change up things, we bought this Milk-bone Soft Chewy Dog Treats, and oh my gosh. He's back to learning all new tricks again just for a small taste of these. What is so funny now, we offer him the Little Bites Treat square and he's all excited and grabs it, but then drops it immediately while sitting in the at attention pose with no movement at all waiting for this new Milk-bone Soft Chewy Dog Treat..... Once we give him that, he is all posed for another trick/training lesson. Of course if we leave the other square treat laying, he will quickly snatch it up after the Milk-bone treat is gone. But we are so happy he is happy and attentive with these. Thank you!
By most accounts, the history of the industry begins with a man named James Spratt. An electrician from Cincinnati, Spratt had patented a new type of lightning conductor in 1850. Later in the decade, he traveled to England to sell it. According to industry lore, he had a quayside epiphany in London when he saw a group of dogs eating discarded hardtack, the cheap, tough biscuits carried on ships and known to sailors as "molar breakers." The first major chunk of today's pet industry was born.
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Not sure what I did wrong but the dough turned out SOOOOO wet! I ended up adding another 1/2 cup of oats and another 1-1.5 cups of flour before I could work with it! And it was still very gummy. BUT I got it to work and they are now done. They hardened up well still. Just time to cool and let the pooch try them out! I’m sure he will love them but I’m just curious why my dough was so wet? Overall I’m still very happy with the base of this recipe and ingredients as some I’ve seen have me questioning if it’s a good idea to feed some of the ingredients to my pup. I did sub out canola oil for olive oil as well as I didnt have an canola!

The bones are small, the size of small regular milk bones, and don't have an offensive odor. They're a brown color and are chewy but not super soft by any means. Molly still has to chew for a while to get these to break down. She had a few of them today but I am going to have to cut back because she is starting to want more and more treats and less actual dog food (which I can't blame her for). I think I will limit these to one per day. They come in a great jar with a screw on/off lid so they'll stay fresh for quite a while. There are loads of them in the 25 ounce jar so these are a good value.


Spratt dominated the American market until 1907, when F. H. Bennett, whose own dog biscuits were faring poorly against those of the larger company, had the idea of making them in the shape of a bone. "His 'Maltoid Milk-Bones' were such a success that for the next fifteen years Bennett's Milk-Bone dominated the commercial dog food market in America."[18] In 1931, the National Biscuit Company, now known as Nabisco, bought the company.
If your fur baby has a sweet tooth he will love these chews, and oatmeal adds protein and is good for digestion. To make these chewy treats, puree 1/4 C. diced peaches, 1 tbsp. canola oil, 1 tbsp. molasses, 1/4 tsp. vanilla and 1/8 C. water. Combine the puree with 2 C. rolled oats, 1/2 C. water, 1 C. flour and 1 tsp. cinnamon. Scoop spoon-sized dollops on to a lightly greased baking sheet, press them flat with the back of the spoon, and bake at 350 degrees Fahrenheit for 15 minutes. These chewy cookie treats can be stored for two weeks in the refrigerator or six months in the freezer.
Meet the Buddy Biscuits Family Simple, Crunchy Goodness - Born in 1999, I soon set the standard for oven baked dog treats. With simple ingredients, mouth-watering flavor and a satisfying crunch, I am still a favorite of dogs near and far. Soft & delicious, naturally! The soft texture of these mouth-watering treats makes them perfect for our four-legged friends who prefer a soft treat. We packed them with flavor and simple ingredients, so you’ll love them as much as your dog does. Function meets Delicious - Buddy Boosters offer a boost of glucosamine and chondroitin in every piece and Buddy Trainers are the perfect size for training your pup. These low calorie chews are oven baked and have a delicious soft texture. Naturally Purrr-fect Cat Treats! Our cat treats are made from the quality ingredients you want for your cat, like real meat and wholesome vegetables, with no grains or artificial flavors. SNUGGLEOFFOLOUS - So amazing that we had to create a new word to describe how soft, fluffy, snuggly, and wonderful smelling your dog will be after using our grooming products.
In Spain, "pan de perro" is mentioned as early as 1623 in a play by Lope de Vega.[3] It is used here in the sense of giving someone blows; to "give dog's bread" to someone could mean anything from mistreating them to killing them.[4] The latter meaning refers to a special bread (also called zarazas) made with ground glass, poison and needles and intended to kill dogs.[5]
Anyway, this big tub holds loads of treats and lasts for ages. I give Molly one a day or sometimes skip a day because she has a variety of treats. I have found that Milk Bone brand makes many treats that my dog enjoys (except for the actual hard milk bones, She won't touch those). The quality s good and the price is also good for the amount of product you get. Molly prefers Pupperoni or other chewy treats but enjoys these as well so I will keep buying them for her. They're better for her teeth than all the chewy snacks and they have pretty decent ingredients.
Wow! I have three dogs, A Chihuahua, a King Charles Cavalier and a St. Bernard. They all went wild over these biscuits. I bought a tin of three different size biscuit cutters at Michaels. I'm afraid I'm going to have to search for much bigger one for my St.Bernard! They were very easy to make and rolled out beautifully without any refrigeration. I didn't have fresh parsley or mint, so I just used dried parsely (we were in the middle of a blizzard). I just hope I can keep these guys stocked up now!

When you give the wholesome goodness of Milk-Bone dog snacks, you're giving more than just a tasty treat. The crunchy texture helps remove plaque and tartar buildup, clean your dog’s teeth and even freshen his breath as he chews. These powerhouse biscuits also contain twelve vitamins and minerals to keep your pup in great shape from his teeth to his tail.
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