The case for the plaintiffs was that for many years they and their predecessor, James Spratt, had manufactured and sold, under patents of 1868 and 1881, meat biscuits for feeding dogs, the full name or description of which is " Spratt's Patent Meat Fibrine Dog Cakes," but which are often designated by them, and are commonly known in the trade, as " Spratt's Fibrine Biscuits," or " Spratt's Dog Biscuits," or " Spratt's Dog Cakes," or " Spratt's Meat Biscuits," or " Spratt's Patent Biscuits," or " Patent Dog Biscuits," all which, as the plaintiffs asserted, indicated biscuits of their manufacture and no other. These biscuits are made in a square form, and each is stamped with the words " Spratt's Patent" and with a + in the centre. It was alleged that " the biscuits have been found most valuable as food for dogs, and have acquired a great reputation." They are in large demand, and the plaintiffs make considerable profits from the sale thereof, which profits would be considerably larger but that, as they alleged, fraudulent imitations are frequently palmed off upon the public as the biscuits of the plaintiffs, and then it was charged that the defendant had, in fraud of the plaintiffs and of the public, " been selling to the public, as genuine dog biscuits of the plaintiffs' manufacture, biscuits which are not of the plaintiffs' manufacture, but are a fraudulent imitation thereof as to shape and appearance, and which do not contain the ingredients of the plaintiffs' biscuits." Then several instances were stated in which persons who sent to the shop of the defendant to ask for Spratt's dog biscuits received other biscuits similar, as was alleged, to the plaintiffs' in size, appearance, and weight, the only difference being that, in lieu of the words " Spratt's Patent " and the cross, the biscuits sold were stamped with a hexagon and the words " American meat."
OMG! Thanks a lot for sharing such an informative page about 25 Simple Dog Treat Recipes. I have read your valuable page and gotten much information. I have learned a lot from you that I did not know before. I confused for choosing the dog food recipes information what would be the best for everything but now my confusion has cleared by your review. I hope your all information will help me. Thanks again Jen Gabbard and Keep it up………..
Dog Treat Dough - One thing that you need to consider when choosing cutters is the thickness of your dough. If it contains rolled oats, carob chips, or another chunky ingredient, you want to use very simple shaped cutters like hearts or circles. If your dough is simple and has smooth ingredients, like the turkey wheat free dog treats, you can use shapes that have more detail since the detail will be evident after the biscuits are baked.
There aren't a lot of soft treats suitable for older dogs that have few remaining teeth, mine is such a dog...she loves them...I looked at the soft treats found in the store, many, many of them oddly contain garlic which is listed as bad for dogs....using such treats not knowing that, mine lost a 3" patch of fur...I threw them away and switched to this treat as well as ceaser treats...her fur has grown back and all seems well...as for flavor, I gave them a 5, not because I have eaten them but again, my dog likes them lol
When you give the wholesome goodness of Milk-Bone dog snacks, you're giving more than just a tasty treat. The crunchy texture helps remove plaque and tartar buildup, clean your dog’s teeth and even freshen his breath as he chews. These powerhouse biscuits also contain twelve vitamins and minerals to keep your pup in great shape from his teeth to his tail.
I omitted the butter completely and subbed unsalted PB and 1 whole can of pumpkin puree -- left out the wheat germ, added in 1 1/2 cup of whole oats, switched out the mint for 1 tsp of dried Tarragon, doubled up on the eggs, and used 1/2 cup of water and 1/4 cup of veg oil along with the regular ingredients. I didn't bother with the egg wash before baking them. They came out great and they're something even a human would like. Happy baking! :) This is same review but I forgot to add the forks :)

In a medium bowl, stir together the whole wheat flour, powdered milk, wheat germ, and beef bouillon granules. Stir in the bacon grease and egg. Add ice water 1 tablespoon at a time until dough is wet enough to stick together. On a lightly floured surface, roll the dough out to 1/2 inch thickness and cut with cookie cutters. Place biscuits 1 inch apart onto an ungreased baking sheet.

If your pup loves to chew, make your own chew strips with fresh chicken. Slice chicken breasts into 1/8" thick strips and dehydrate in an oven set to 200 degrees Fahrenheit for about two hours, or until the chicken is dried and chewy. Sprinkle with anise prior to drying for extra flavor. Turkey also can be substituted. Poultry chews make a nice alternative to rawhide treats, which could contain chemicals or preservatives. Store extra chews in the refrigerator or freezer. Chicken jerky can also be made in the microwave by cooking the strips for 20 minutes on medium power until they are chewy.


My husky loves milk bones. We give them as treats for going in her crate or getting back from long walks, etc. She’s a 55 pound husky. I was breaking the large size in half for her so I figured I would just get the medium so I didn’t have to break them. However, I feel like the mediums are so small compared to the large, they almost feel smaller than when I was giving her half a large. The product is fine but I’m unhappy with how big a difference in size there is when moving between medium and large.
My dog loves these! In fact, she now snubs her nose at Milkbones. I omit the sugar, sub the butter with peanut butter, omit the mint and instead double the parsley, which I often just buy dried. I also don't roll them out and use my hands instead to make tiny flat disks--I have a small dog. Great recipe. Makes enough for a two-three month supply for my pooch.
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From fetching his favorite ball to successfully sitting on command, your dog deserves delicious and healthy dog treats. In addition to your verbal praise and affection, there's nothing your dog enjoys more than some mouth-watering rawhide bones or crunchy training treats. Having a natural inclination to please, dogs love to be praised, which is why it's important that they be rewarded with healthy dog biscuits. Healthy dog treats can also add variety to your dog's diet. And because peanut butter dog treats are a fan favorite, they are often available in varieties that provide additional nutritional support under the cloak of their delicious flavor. There are treats enriched with glucosamine to promote better hip and joint health, wheat-grass for better digestion, and more. For dogs with allergies, there are hypoallergenic organic dog treats that are wheat, gluten and corn-free, and even low-calorie treats for less active dogs.
Dog-biscuit is a hard and well-baked mass of coarse, yet clean and wholesome flour, of an inferior kind to that known as sailors' biscuit; and this latter substance, indeed, would be the best substitute for the former with which we are acquainted. A bag of dog-biscuit of five shillings' value, will be an ample supply for a yard-dog during the year: it should be soaked in water, or " pot liquor," for an hour or two ; and if no meat be at hand, a little dripping or lard may be added to it while softening, which will make a relishing meal at a trifling cost. We have for many years known the utility of the plan thus advocated, and we earnestly recommend all who value the safety of the community and their own (to say nothing of the happiness of the canine race), to make trial of the rational and feasible plan which we have detailed." (1841)[12]
Mr. Horton Smith, Q.C., in opening the case for the plaintiffs, said that, suspecting that their biscuits were being pirated by the defendant, they adopted the usual course of sending persons to his shop to ask for Spratt's dog biscuits, and in every instance Benton's American meat biscuits, which were similar in shape, size, and general character, were delivered. (April 10, 1886)[16]
Every morning my little pug wakes up and patiently waits while i get ready to go outside and do his business. Upon our return he loses his patience and quite verbally demands one of these little dog snacks. Sometimes, he will get impatient and ask for one in the elevator before we even get in to the kitchen. Attached is a picture of this little guy who loves these Milkbone Mini Flavor Snacks.
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Knead dough on a lightly floured surface for 2 minutes (dough will be sticky). Roll out dough to 1/4-inch thickness. Cut out rounds using a 2-inch fluted cutter. Transfer to baking sheets. Make an indentation towards the bottom of 1 circle using your thumb, then press dough to make an arch of 4 small circles on top of the thumbprint using the tip of your pinky. Repeat with remaining rounds. Freeze for 15 minutes. Bake for 20 minutes, rotating sheets and lightly brushing with remaining 1/2 cup chicken stock halfway through. Turn oven off, and let stand in oven for 40 minutes.
When preparing homemade dog treats, make sure you take into account any allergies that your pet has to specific ingredients. You will want to avoid adding any ingredient that you suspect that your pet has reacted poorly to in the past. If you are experimenting with new flavors, only feed a small amount of the treat to your dog to see how she reacts to it before giving him an entire treat.
My little Yorkie is so picky. She detests regular milk bones and will not touch them so I was taking a chance buying her this big jar of Milk Bone Soft & Chewy Bones. They came yesterday along with some other treats I bought for her and I decided to offer her one of these bones first. She gets excited when new treats come and was hoping, I think, for more Beggin' Strips but I wanted to change things up. Plus these are actually pretty healthy for her and not too high in calories. She is only eight pounds but the vet wants me to keep her at that weight to avoid issues later on. She is 3 years old now and healthy.

my daughter gave me a deer head/ applehead chiahihiau for a late chritmas present she will be 1 year old the end of july I am noticeing the she will not eat the store boughten treats so I thought I would try homemade treats im also noticeing she will not play with toys I think because she was mistreated befor I got her I keep trying thank you for listening
Thank you to the readers who have mentioned the issue with using bacon fat for dogs. A trace amount of bacon grease (two tablespoons divided amongst 30 biscuits = less than 1 gram of bacon fat per serving) shouldn’t be a concern. Of course, we’re not veterinarians over here, so please check with your vet or use an alternative type of oil if you are concerned.
My dog, a boston terrier, loves this treat. They are small enough that I can give her a couple, so I like to use them when training for tricks to reward her for doing something particularly hard. They are more exciting than training treats but can still be eaten quickly. This is a huge bin, a great price, and the container is air tight. There are a lot of little bugs where I live that like to infiltrate my dog food, so I actually keep the container every time I empty one and use it to store dog food, treats, etc. The wide mouth to the jar means it's very easy to get in and out of.

It’s Earth Day — or Earth Month, as we prefer! — so naturally, we’re turning our focus to the kitchen. And specifically ways we can create less waste and be more efficient and thoughtful with our output. Between packaging and food scraps, some degree of kitchen waste feels inevitable. For most, there’s no way to eliminate it entirely, but there are a lot of small and easy ways to limit the amount of waste coming out of our kitchens.
I bought these Milk-Bone MaroSnacks previously and my Min Pin (as well as the poodle next door ;) loved them, so I purchased them again and for some reason this time, they are making my dog sick with diarrhea. I just had her to the vet and she got a clean bill of health and she only gets the 'growling stomach' & diarrhea when I give her one of these snacks. I don't know if they changed the ingredients or what?
In a medium bowl, stir together the whole wheat flour, powdered milk, wheat germ, and beef bouillon granules. Stir in the bacon grease and egg. Add ice water 1 tablespoon at a time until dough is wet enough to stick together. On a lightly floured surface, roll the dough out to 1/2 inch thickness and cut with cookie cutters. Place biscuits 1 inch apart onto an ungreased baking sheet.
If your dog truly can’t get enough peanut butter, pick up some peanut butter dog treats to reward him without the mess usually accompanied by the creamy stuff. Some dogs get a kick out of treat dispensing toys others get the most joy out of gnawing on their favorite rawhide bones. Rawhide bones and antlers for dogs don’t just keep your dog entertained, they also help clean their teeth and promote gum health. Whether your special pooch prefers to earn an irresistible training treat or munch on some organic dog treats, reward your dog today with his favorite nutritious and flavorful dog treats.
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